X
GO
Academy of Research In Occupational Therapy

Established in 1983, the AOTF Academy of Research in Occupational Therapy recognizes individuals who have made exemplary, distinguished, and sustained contributions toward the science of occupational therapy. Every year, the Academy of Research invites nominations for membership. After consideration of the nominations and supporting materials, the Academy selects individuals to be inducted into this distinguished body of researchers. Normally, inductions occur at the next AOTA Annual Conference and Exposition.  

Congratulations to the 2019 inductees to the Academy: Drs. Yael Goverover, Hui-Ing Ma, Timothy Reistetter, Robert Sainburg, and Susan Stark.

Click for Printable List View of the Members of the Academy of Research

Click here to view the Nomination Procedures.

* indicates a deceased member.

2019 Inductees to the Academy
Susan Stark, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA

Susan Stark, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA

2019

Dr. Stark is Associate Professor of Occupational Therapy, Neurology and Social Work at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.  Dr. Stark has built an impressive research program examining environmental modifications and adaptation to support aging-in-place for community-dwelling older adults. She has focused her efforts on older adults vulnerable for institutional placement, particularly those with impairments due to chronic and degenerative conditions such as stroke and dementia. Dr. Stark’s thematically linked research program has direct implications for occupational therapy research and practice. What sets Dr. Stark’s research apart from most aging research is her study of the lived environment. Perhaps this is not innovative in the mind of an occupational therapy scientist; however, it is very innovative to scientists outside our discipline. In addition, Dr. Stark’s studies address a complex range of personal, environmental, and functional factors that contribute to falls in the home. Her more recent research examines the timing of falls in the progression of preclinical Alzheimer’s disease, and the association between this timing and pre-identified neuroimaging correlates. Findings from this study are likely to improve early identification of candidates likely to benefit from intervention, with the intent that such intervention may contribute to slowed trajectories of decline.

 

Q & A


Identify three words that others have used to describe you.
My three favorite are: open-minded, gritty, altruistic.

How do you hope to make a difference in the world through research?
The informal motto of our lab has always been to “make the world a little better place.” Our motto is the touchstone we use to make decisions about new opportunities. It is my hope that through our research we will influence OT practice and health policy. We hope to provide environmental support for adults and older adults with disabilities so they can live safe and fulfilling lives with their families at home and in their communities. My approach is to develop home modification interventions, demonstrate their efficacy, demonstrate their implementation and effectiveness, and disseminate the information to occupational therapy practitioners. 

What is one piece of advice you have for individuals considering a career in science and research?
Study something you are passionate about, find good and kind mentors (really listen to them), be tenacious

Beside your own areas of inquiry, what is one research priority that you believe is important for the future of occupational science and occupational therapy?
Participation, as defined by the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health is “involvement in a life situation.”  Understanding the participation restrictions people experience (functioning of a person as a member of society) is a fundamental core question of occupational therapy.  The most important research priority for OT is operationalizing and measuring participation, intervening to improve participation outcomes and preventing participation restrictions (disability). 

Describe the most important role that mentors played in your professional journey.  
In addition to being my strong advocates, my kind and generous mentors have given me a roadmap to success in my research.  They have provided me with clear goals and expectations, explicit directions to achieve the goals, and access to resources.  These are the important (often unwritten) “how-to’s” for a successful research career.  Having that roadmap available helped me set my course and stay true. Their “map” showed me where to find resources, where I should detour, what rocky roads lay ahead, and were I could rest.  My mentors have given me a clear picture of where I could go and the costs and benefits of the journey. 

Identify a favorite occupation that renews you outside of your work. 
Time with my family, especially travel.    

What has been the most surprising or rewarding aspects of a career in science and research?
The most rewarding aspect of my career are the relationships I have as a result of my work.  I treasure the relationships I have forged with colleagues, research participants and trainees. 

 

 

Selected References

Stark, S, Keglovits, M, Arbesman, M, & Lieberman, D. (2017). Effect of home modification interventions on the participation of community-dwelling adults with health conditions: A systematic review. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 71, 7102290010. https://doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2017.018887

Stark, SL, Somerville, E, Keglovits, M, Smason, A, & Bigham, K. (2015). Clinical reasoning guideline for home modification interventions. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 69, 6902290030. http://dx.doi.org/ 10.5014/ajot.2015.014266

Stark, S, Keglovits, M, Somerville, E, Hu, YL, Conte, J, Yan, Y. Feasibility of a novel intervention to improve participation after stroke. (2017) British Journal of Occupational Therapy 1, 1–9

Stark, S. L, Somerville, EK, & Morris, JC. (2010). In-Home Occupational Performance Evaluation (I–HOPE). American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 64, 580–589. doi: 10.5014/ajot.2010.08065

Stark, SL, Roe, CM, Grant, EA, Hollingsworth, H, Benzinger, TL, Buckles, VD, Morris, JC. (2013) Preclinical Alzheimer disease and risk of falls.  Neurology 81.

Previous Article Robert Sainburg, PhD, OTR/L
Print
1484 Rate this article:
No rating

Theme picker

Members of the Academy of Research

A. Jean Ayres*, PhD, OTR, FAOTA

1983

A. Jean Ayres*, PhD, OTR, FAOTA

1920 - 1989

"The sensory integration (SI) specialty was originally developed by A. Jean Ayres, PhD, OTR, who was both an occupational therapist and an educational psychologist. A former member of the USC occupational therapy faculty, she developed a theoretical framework, a set of standardized tests (today known as the Sensory Integration and Praxis Tests"), and a clinical approach for identification and remediation of SI problems in children. Her publications on sensory integration span a 30-year period from the 1960's through the 1980's, and include psychometric studies as well as clinical trials and single case studies."  (Retrieved on December 18, 2014 from http://chan.usc.edu/academics/sensory-integration.) 

 

 

Selected References

Ayres, AJ. (1963). Eleanor Clarke Slagle Lecture: The development of perceptual-motor abilities: A theoretical basis for treatment of dysfunction. The American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 17, 221-225.
Ayres, A. J. (1972). Sensory Integration and Learning Disorders. Los Angeles, CA: Western Psychological Services.
Ayres, AJ. (1972). Types of sensory integrative dysfunction among disabled learners. The American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 26, 13-18.

Nancy Baker, ScD, MPH, OTR/L

2009

Nancy Baker, ScD, MPH, OTR/L

Dr. Baker is Associate Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy, Tufts University.  Her research "focuses on the prevention and treatment of musculoskeletal disorders primarily of the hand and arm. Her research reflects a synthesis of preventing work related hand injuries (ergonomics), addressing limitations due to arthritis, and examining conservative treatments for work-related hand injuries, particularly carpal tunnel syndrome. Her expertise in clinical hand biomechanics has also lead to collaborations with others interested in the effect of disability on hand coordination, such as the effects of glaucoma, or the effects of prosthetic use.

Baker's research is eclectic and uses a variety of tools and techniques to answer her research questions. She has experience with instrument development (Keyboard – Personal Computer Style [K-PeCS); motion capture analysis of upper extremity function; and has completed two randomized clinical trials, one on computer keyboard use, and one comparing conservative treatments of carpal tunnel syndrome. She has developed skills in large dataset analyses and is developing health systems intervention research to improve the care of people with carpal tunnel syndrome.

From her experiences in work rehabilitation, Baker developed an interest in epidemiology and population level research. She obtained a Masters of Public Health in Epidemiology in 2009, and was a Guest Researcher at the Centers for Disease Control Division of Population Health: Arthritis, Epilepsy, and Well-Being Branch from 2014 to 2015. She is currently exploring how knowledge translation and implementation science can be used to increase the uptake of evidence-based treatments in occupational therapy."  (Retrieved on March 15 2019 from https://ase.tufts.edu/occupationalTherapy/people/baker.htm.)

Dr. Baker became an associate editor of OTJR: Occupation, Participation and Health in February 2017.

 

 

Selected References

Baker, NA, Moehling, K, Park, SY. (2015) The effect of a fixed split-angle keyboard on musculoskeletal discomfort: A randomized cross-over trial. Work, 50(4):677-86. doi: 10.3233/WOR-131797
Qin, J, Theis, KA, Barbour, KE, Helmick, CG, Baker, NA, Brady, TJ. (2015) The impact of arthritis and multiple chronic conditions on selected life domains, United States, 2013. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR), 64(21):578-582
Baker, NA, Barbour, K, Helmick, C, Zack, MM, Al Snih, S. (2017) Associations between arthritis and change in physical function in U.S. retirees. Journal of Gerontology A: Biological Sciences Medical Sciences, 72(1):127-133. doi: 10.1093/gerona/glw075
Baker, NA, Barbour, K, Helmick, C, Zack, M, Al Snih, S. (2017) Arthritis and cognitive impairment in older adults. International Rheumatology, 37(6):955-961. doi: 10.1007/s00296-017-3698-1
Bove, AM, Baker, NA, *Livengood, H, King, V, Mancino, J, Popchak, A, Fitzgerald, K. (2017) Task-specific training for adults with chronic knee pain: a case series. Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy,;47(8):548-556. doi: 10.2519/jospt.2017.7349
Qin, J, Barbour, L, Murphy, L, Baker, NA, Helmick, C, Theis, K, Schwartz, T, Renner, J, Nelson, A, Allen, K, Jordan, J. (2017) Lifetime risk of symptomatic hand osteoarthritis: The Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project. Arthritis & Rheumatology, 69(6):1204-1212. doi: 10.1002/art.40097
Baker, NA, Livengood, H, Nau, AC, Owens, G, Chambers, AJ, Trout, J, Cham, R. (2017) Effect of central and peripheral vision occlusion on motor performance during hand coordination tasks. IIE Transactions on Occupational Ergonomics and Human Factors,5(3-4):148-157. doi: 10.1080/24725838.2017.1398691
Bass, J, Baker, NA. (2017) Occupational therapy and public health: Advancing research to improve population health and health equity. Occupational Therapy Journal of Research, 37(4):175-177. doi: 10.1177/1539449217731665
Baker, NA, Stevans, J, Terhorst, L, Haas, A, Kuo, Y-F, Al Snih, S. What types of treatment are provided for patients with carpal tunnel syndrome? A retrospective analysis of commercial insurance. PM&R. Online pre-publication doi: 10.1016/j.pmrj.2018.02.004
Pure, E, Terhorst, L, Baker, NA.(2018) Movement and manual therapy for adults with arthritis: National Health Interview Survey. Complementary Therapies in Medicine, 37:96-102. Doi 0.1016/j.ctim.2018.02.007 

Grace T. Baranek, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA

2008

Grace T. Baranek, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA

Grace Baranek is a prolific scholar and internationally renowned expert on sensory features of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). She earned her bachelor's degree in occupational therapy from the University of Illinois at the Medical Center and both her master's and PhD degrees in psychology from the University of Illinois at Chicago. Prior to her 2016 appointment as associate dean and chair of the USC Chan Division, she was a professor and associate chair for research in the Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy Department of Allied Health Sciences at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
 
Beginning in 2003, Dr. Baranek was the Principal Investigator of the Sensory Experiences Project funded by the National Institute Health (NIH) National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD). The 10-year study totaling more than $4.5M in NICHD grant funding aimed to explain the developmental course, mechanisms and functional effects of sensory features in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Sensory features are highly prevalent in children with ASD and may impact daily activities, routines and social participation.
 
During her career, Dr. Baranek has served as either the Principal or Co-Principal Investigator of extramural grants funded by the NIH/NICHD, the U.S. Department of Defense, the U.S. Department of Education, the Autism Speaks Foundation, and the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA). She has been a member of working groups of the National Academy of Science and the NIH to establish guidelines for evidence-based practices for children with ASD.
 
She has co-authored more than 65 peer-reviewed articles in interdisciplinary publications including Autism Research, Autism, the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders and the American Journal of Occupational Therapy (AJOT). She is also the lead author of the First Years Inventory, a screening tool for infants aged 9-15 months who are at risk for a later diagnosis of ASD.
 
In 2016, Dr. Baranek was a co-recipient of the AOTA Cordelia Myers AJOT Best Article Award and in 2013 she received the American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology Editor's Award. (Retrieved on February 27, 2017 from http://chan.usc.edu/faculty/directory/Grace_Baranek)


Selected References

Baranek, GT, Watson, LR, Boyd, BA, Poe, MD, David, FJ & McGuire, L.  (2013). Hyporesponsiveness to social and nonsocial sensory stimuli in children with autism, children with developmental delays, and typically developing children.  Development and Psychopathology, 25, 307-320.

Baranek, GT, Roberts, J., David, FJ, Sideris, J, Mirrett, PL, Hatton, DD & Bailey, D. B. (2008). Developmental trajectories and correlates of sensory processing in young boys with fragile X syndrome. Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics, 28, (1), 79-98.

Little, LM, Sideris, J, Ausderau, K & Baranek, GT.  (2014). Activity participation among children with autism spectrum disorder.  American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 68, 477-485.

M. Carolyn Baum, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA

2006

M. Carolyn Baum, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA

Dr. Baum is Elias Michael Director and Professor of Occupational Therapy, Neurology, and Social Work, School of Medicine and Brown School, Washington University, St, Louis, Missouri. Her clinical interests are in the areas of aging, occupational performance assessment, and program development using a Person-Environment-Occupational Performance Model. Dr. Baum's research focuses on the role of cognition in everyday life and the enabling of everyday performance in people with chronic health conditions and disability. (Retrieved on Dec 19, 2014 from http://www.ot.wustl.edu/about/our-people/faculty/carolyn-m-baum-254.)

From 2001 to 2003, Dr. Baum was editor of the AOTF research journal, OTJR: Occupation, Participation and Health.  Dr. Baum is one of the 100 Influential People in Occupational Therapy named by AOTA.

 

Q and A

Identify three words that others have used to describe you.  
Doer, Enabler, Futurist.

How do you hope to make a difference in the world through research?
By building collaborations to address questions that improve the human condition.

What is one piece of advice you have for individuals considering a career in science and research?
Choose an environment where you work with successful scientists in your entry level training.

Beside your own areas of inquiry, what is one research priority that you believe is important for the future of occupational science and occupational therapy?
Understanding how social supports (emotional, informational and instrumental) support daily life.

Describe the most important role that mentors played in your professional journey.
Challenging my ideas.

Identify a favorite occupation that renews you outside of your work.
Cooking for guests.

What has been the most surprising or rewarding aspects of a career in science and research?
The relationships that develop from shared ideas to friendships.


Selected References

Baum, C. M. (1980). Eleanor Clarke Slagle Lectureship - 1980: Occupational therapists put care in the health system. The American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 34, 505-516.

Baum, CM & Edwards, D. (2008). Activity Sort Card: ACS. Bethesda, MD: AOTA Press.

Morrison, MT, Giles, GM, Ryan, JD, Baum, CM, Dromerick, AW, Polatajko, HJ & Edwards, DF. (2013). Multiple Errands Test - Revised (MET - R): A performance-based measure of executive function in people with mild cerebrovascular accident. The American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 67, 460-468.

Polatajko, HJ, McEwen, SE, Ryan, JD & Baum, CM. (2012). Pilot randomized controlled trial investigating cognitive strategy use to improve goal performance after stroke. The American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 66, 104-109.

Gary Bedell, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA

2016

Gary Bedell, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA

Dr. Bedell is associate professor and chair of the Department of Occupational Therapy at Tufts University. His research and scholarship involves development of measures and interventions focused on participation of children and youth with disabilities. He consults, writes and presents on conceptual and methodological considerations for measuring participation and the physical and social environment. His measures are used nationally and internationally.

He is author of the Child and Adolescent Scale of Participation (CASP) and Child and Adolescent Scale of Environment (CASE) and co-author of the Participation and Environment Measure for Children and Youth (PEM-CY) and Young Children's Participation and Environment Measure (YC-PEM). Dr. Bedell was Measurement Core Co-director for the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Interventions for Children and Youth with Traumatic Brain Injury and is Collaborating Researcher for the CanChild Centre for Childhood Disability Research, McMaster University. His currently funded research involves development and testing of an app-based coaching intervention for teenagers with traumatic brain injury: Social Participation And Navigation (SPAN).McCauley, S.R, Wilde, E.A., Anderson, V., Bedell, G., Beers, S., ... & Yeates, K.O. (2012).

 

Q and A

Identify three words that others have used to describe you.
Pragmatic, collaborative, and interdisciplinary.

How do you hope to make a difference in the world through research?
My plan is to continue to collaborate with multiple stakeholders locally and globally to ensure best practices to measure and promote participation of individuals with disabilities across the lifespan in home, school and community life. My hope is that my work and the work of many of my esteemed colleagues will ensure that stakeholders are able to select measures that can address their information goals and select intervention approaches that acknowledge and leverage the expertise of clients and their loved ones.

What is one piece of advice you have for individuals considering a career in science and research?
I would first say that there are many pathways to embark or re-embark on a career in science and research depending on your life situation, opportunities and level of commitment. These pathways could be in the form of post-doctoral fellowships, mentored research award, or developing your own self-directed collaborations with more experienced research mentors that are doing work in areas that resonate with you. Also, a committed work ethic, openness to feedback and development of a thick skin particularly in response to grant proposals that may not be funded or manuscripts that might be rejected or require extensive revisions will serve you well (I'm still working on the thicker skin).

Beside your own areas of inquiry, what is one research priority that you believe is important for the future of occupational science and occupational therapy?
An important future priority is research that examines effective, efficient and safe uses of technology and tele- health to deliver occupational therapy or occupational therapy-informed interdisciplinary interventions to help individuals with disabilities or at risk of disability and their loved ones to manage or co-manage daily life activities. I also believe continued study into the health and societal benefits of meaningful occupation are critical for the future of occupational therapy and science.

Describe the most important role that mentors played in your professional journey.
My mentors provided me with numerous opportunities that challenged me to step out of my comfort zone and provided me with constructive feedback along the way. This started in my doctoral program at NYU with Dr. Jim Hinojosa and continued during my post-doctoral fellowship at BU with Drs. Stephen Haley, Wendy Coster and Alan Jette. Key advice that has served me well was to collaborate and share resources with colleagues across disciplines and to seek out multiple funding sources especially when starting out whether this be through private foundations, professional associations, federal funding or internal funding.


Identify a favorite occupation that renews you outside of your work.
Kayaking with my dogs in Provincetown, Massachusetts where I also dabble a little bit in painting (so hard to choose one occupation :) .

What has been the most surprising or rewarding aspects of a career in science and research?
The most rewarding aspect of my work is the acknowledgement that many interdisciplinary colleagues around the world are using my measures and citing my prior studies to inform their research. This would not have been possible without the strong collaborations and sharing of knowledge and expertise I have had along the way.


Selected References

McCauley, S.R, Wilde, E.A., Anderson, V., Bedell, G., Beers, S., ... & Yeates, K.O. (2012). Recommendations for the use of common outcome measures on pediatric traumatic brain injury research. Journal of Neurotrauma, 29, 678-705. doi: 10.1089/neu.2011.1838. PMID 21644810.

Bedell, G., Coster, W., Law, M., Liljenquist, K., Kao, YC, Teplicky, R., Anaby, D, & Khetani, MA (2013). Community participation, supports and barriers of school-age children with and without disabilities. Archives of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, 94, 315-323. doi:10.1016/j.apmr.2012.09.024. PMID 23044364.

Bedell, G., Khetani, M. Cousins, M., Coster, W., & Law, M. (2011). Parent perspectives to inform development of measures of children's participation and environment. Archives of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, 9, 765- 773. doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2010.12.029. PMID 21530724.

Bedell, G., & McDougall, J. (2013). The Child and Adolescent Scale of Environment (CASE): Further validation with youth who have chronic health conditions. Developmental Neurorehabilitation. Early online publication. doi: 10.3109/17518423.2103.855273. PMID 24304145.

McDougall, J., Bedell, G., & Wright, V. (2013). The youth report version of the Child and Adolescent Scale of Participation (CASP): Assessment of psychometric properties and comparison with parent report. Child: Care, Health and Development, 39, 512-522. doi: 10.1111/cch.12050. PMID 23763252.

Daniel Bourbonnais, PhD, OT(C)

2007

Daniel Bourbonnais, PhD, OT(C)

Dr. Bourbonnais is Vice-dean for Research and Innovation in Science and Professor, University of Montreal and Researcher, Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Rehabilitation of Metropolitan Montreal.  His areas of research interest include the assessment and treatment of the upper limb; motor control of the hand; bilateral coordination; and posture and movement coordination in persons with stroke.  (Retrieved on December 21, 2014 from http://www.crir.ca/?A1E61E1F-3E97-456C-B6D9-6041A59AADDD&extendedview=1&extendedres=EC844717-CD62-448E-8B5B-C04A71426E31¶meters=ID:12.)  


Selected References

Forget, N, Piotte, F, Arsenault, J, Harris, P & Bourbonnais, D. (2008). Bilateral thumb's active range of motion and strength in de Quervain's disease: comparison with a normal sample. Journal of Hand Therapy, 21, (3), 276-284, Quiz, 285.

Knaut, L A, Subramanian, SK, McFadyen, BJ, Bourbonnais, D & Levin, MF. (2009). Kinematics of pointing movements made in a virtual versus a physical 3-dimensional environment in healthy and stroke subjects. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 90, 793-802.

Messier, S, Bourbonnais, D, Desrosiers, J & Roy, Y. (2006). Kinematic analysis of upper limbs and trunk movement during bilateral movement after stroke. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 87, (11), 1463-1470.

Anita C. Bundy, ScD, OTR, FAOTA

2012

Anita C. Bundy, ScD, OTR, FAOTA

Dr. Bundy is Chair of Occupational Therapy in the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Sydney. For 3 decades, she has conducted research into children's play and is recognised as an expert internationally. She is best known for developing theory and research in play with children who have disabilities and in sensory integration. She has a strong interest in the everyday lives of children with disabilities   (Retrieved on Dec 19, 2014 from http://sydney.edu.au/health-sciences/about/people/profiles/anita.bundy.php.)     


Q and A

Identify three words that others have used to describe you.
Creative, persistent, playful.

How do you hope to make a difference in the world through research?
A lot of my research has been into children's play--often considered a "second class occupation". I hope that my work helps therapists and others to understand the importance of play and to promote it actively and unabashedly.

What is one piece of advice you have for individuals considering a career in science and research?
Do work that you are passionate about and develop a very thick skin.

Beside your own areas of inquiry, what is one research priority that you believe is important for the future of occupational science and occupational therapy?
I think that research testing interventions is among the most important work we have yet to do.

Describe the most important role that mentors played in your professional journey.
Mentors have asked the hard questions--the ones that make me ponder for weeks and sometimes years.

Identify a favorite occupation that renews you outside of your work.
There are several: cooking, gardening, playing the flute, hiking, biking.

What has been the most surprising or rewarding aspects of a career in science and research?
I always thought I would hate doing research and then I discovered that it was like a giant puzzle; you find one piece and it leads to the next.


Selected References

Bundy, AC, Kolrosova, J, Paguinto, SG, Bray, P, Swain, B, Wallen, M & Engelen, L. (2011). Comparing the effectiveness of a parent group intervention with child-based intervention for promoting playfulness in children with disabilities. The Israeli Journal of Occupational Therapy, 20, E95-E113.

Bundy, AC, Waugh, K & Brentnall, J. (2009). Developing assessments that account for the role of the environment: an example using the Test of Playfulness and Test of Environmental Supportiveness. OTJR: Occupation, Participation and Health, 29, 135-143.

Hill, C. & Bundy, AC. (2014).  Reliability and validity of a new instrument to measure tolerance of everyday risk for children. Child Care, Health and Development, 40, 68-76.

Leeanne M. Carey, BAppSC(OT), PhD

2009

Leeanne M. Carey, BAppSC(OT), PhD

Dr. Carey heads the Neurorehabilitation and Recovery research group in the Stroke Division, Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health and is Professor of Occupational Therapy, School of Allied Health, La Trobe University in Australia. Dr. Carey's research program focuses on stroke rehabilitation and recovery: in particular how the brain adapts and how we might harness that potential in rehabilitation. She uses tools such as MRI to investigate changes in the brain and how this knowledge may be used to better understand recovery and target rehabilitation most optimally to individual stroke survivors. Research includes the impact of depression and cognition on stroke recovery. An important focus has been to translate these discoveries into clinical practice and better outcomes for stroke survivors.  (Retrieved on February 5, 2015 from   http://www.florey.edu.au/about-florey/our-people/staff-directory/39/leeanne-carey.)   

 

Q and A

Identify three words that others have used to describe you.
Visionary, dedicated, collaborative.

How do you hope to make a difference in the world through research?
I hope to harness real world drivers of neural plasticity to help stroke survivors realise their full potential.
I also hope to grow research-clinicians and research capacity in occupational therapy.

What is one piece of advice you have for individuals considering a career in science and research?
Go for it! If you have a question and a passion then seek an active research environment with strong supervisory team and make it happen! The benefits for you, your clients and our profession are immeasurable.

Beside your own areas of inquiry, what is one research priority that you believe is important for the future of occupational science and occupational therapy?
I believe occupational therapists should be leading the way in conducting research that creates the right environment for healing and realising one's full potential.

Describe the most important role that mentors played in your professional journey.
Belief and challenge that help open the door to new perspectives and opportunities.

Identify a favorite occupation that renews you outside of your work.
Spending time with friends, family and colleagues who are also friends.

What has been the most surprising or rewarding aspects of a career in science and research?
Learning something new from each participant and student I work with, and seeing the difference new discoveries can make to the lives of people who have experienced brain injury.

 

Selected References

Carey, LM. (Ed.) (2012). Stroke rehabilitation insights from neuroscience and imaging.  New York: Oxford University Press.

Hubbard, IJ, Carey, LM, Budd, TW & Parsons, MW.   (2014). Reorganizing Therapy: Changing the Clinical Approach to Upper Limb Recovery Post-Stroke.  Occupational Therapy International, 18, 28-35.

Hubbard, IJ, Carey, LM, Budd, TW, Levi, C, McElduff, P, Hudson, S, Bateman, G & Parsons, MW.   (2014). A Randomized Controlled Trial of the Effect of Early Upper-Limb Training on Stroke Recovery and Brain Activation. Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, 19, 1545968314562647. [Epub ahead of print]

Pumpa, LU, Cahill, LS & Carey, LM.  (2015 Jan 23). Somatosensory assessment and treatment after stroke: An evidence-practice gap.  Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, doi: 10.1111/1440-1630.12170. [Epub ahead of print]

Jane Case-Smith*, EdD, OTR/L, FAOTA

2015

Jane Case-Smith*, EdD, OTR/L, FAOTA

September 5, 1953 - July 30, 2014. Membership awarded posthumously.

At the time of her passing, Dr. Case-Smith was Professor and Director of the Program in Occupational Therapy in the School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Medicine at The Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio. A highly regarded educator, Dr. Case-Smith was co-editor and author of a widely adopted textbook: Occupational Therapy with Children, now in its seventh edition.

Jane Case-Smith was considered one of the nation's foremost experts in pediatric occupational therapy and rehabilitation. She studied, wrote, and lectured on a broad range of topics such as early intervention, autism spectrum disorders, cerebral palsy, movement therapy, and home-based services. She was also a respected clinical scientist, and had extensive experience as a grant reviewer for federal agencies and charitable foundations. At the time of her passing, she was principal investigator on two NIH-funded studies.  

In 2001, Dr. Case-Smith was the recipient of the AOTF A. Jean Ayres award.  From 2008 - 2011, she was the chief editor of OTJR: Occupation, Participation and Health, AOTF's research journal.  (Retrieved on February 25, 2015 from AOTF Mourns Passing of Dr. Jane Case-Smith.pdf)

An OTJR article (Roll, Darragh, O'Brien, and Fisher, 2014) celebrated Dr. Case-Smith's life and expounded on her outstanding contributions to occupational therapy as researcher, clinical practitioner, and educator.

Dr. Case-Smith is one of the 100 Influential People in Occupational Therapy named by AOTA.

 

Selected References

Case-Smith, J & O'Brien, JC. (Eds.).  (2015). Occupational therapy for children and Adolescents. (7th Ed.).  St Louis, Mo: Mosby/Elsevier.

Case-Smith, J, Frolek Clark, GJ & Schlabach, T. L. (2013). Systematic review of interventions used in occupational therapy to promote motor performance for children ages birth-5 years. The American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 67, 413-424.  

Case-Smith, J, Weaver, L & Holland T. (2014). Effects of a classroom-embeddedoccupational therapist-teacher handwriting program for first-grade students. The American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 68, 690-698.

DeLuca, SC, Case-Smith, J, Stevenson, R & Ramey SL.  (2012). Constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) for young children with cerebral palsy: effects of therapeutic dosage.  Journal of Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine, 5, 133-142.

Roll, SC, Darragh, AR, O'Brien, JC & Fisher, TF. (2014).  In Memoriam: Jane Douglas Case-Smith (September 5, 1953 - July 30, 2014). OTJR: Occupation, Participation and Health, 34, 171-175.

Sharon A. Cermak, EdD, OTR/L, FAOTA

1984

Sharon A. Cermak, EdD, OTR/L, FAOTA

Dr. Cermak is Professor, Mrs. T.H. Chan Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles and has a joint appointment with the Keck School of Medicine of USC, Department of Pediatrics.  Dr. Cermak is renowned for her expertise in Dyspraxia/Developmental Coordination Disorder, a long-standing interest of hers. . . [Her] current research focuses on health promotion in children with disabilities, which is a critical area of national health concern for children.  (Retrieved on January 29, 2015 from http://chan.usc.edu/faculty/directory/Sharon_Cermak.)

In 1991, Dr. Cermak received the AOTF A. Jean Ayres Award.  Dr. Cermak is one of the 100 Influential People in Occupational Therapy named by AOTA.


Selected References

Foran, AC, Cermak, SA & Spruijt-Metz, D.  (2013). Psychosocial determinants of participation in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity among Hispanic and Latinamiddle school-aged girls. Hispanic Health Care International, 11, 142-148.

Lifshitz, N, Raz-Silbiger, S, Weintraub, N, Steinhart, S, Cermak, SA & Katz N.  (2014).

Physical fitness and overweight in Israeli children with and without developmental coordination disorder: gender differences.  Research in Developmental Disabilities, 35, 2773-2780.

Raz-Silbiger, S, Lifshitz, N, Katz, N, Steinhart, S, Cermak, SA & Weintraub N.  (2015). Relationship between motor skills, participation in leisure activities and quality of life of children with Developmental Coordination Disorder: Temporal aspects. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 38, 171-180. 

Florence A. Clark, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA

1986

Florence A. Clark, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA

Dr. Clark is Professor at the Mrs. T. H.  Chan Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Southern California (USC), Los Angeles. She is a past president of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA). In 1992, Dr. Clark was the Eleanor Clarke Slagle Lecturer, AOTA's highest academic honor, and in 1999 she received AOTA's Award of Merit. Dr. Clark received the AOTA-AOTF Presidents' Award in Honor of Wilma L. West in 2017 and was named one of the 100 Influential People in Occupational Therapy by AOTA.


Since 1985, Florence Clark has attracted more than $10 million in extramural funding from NIH, NIDRR, and other federal agencies for research and training in the areas of healthy aging and the secondary conditions that impede the flourishing of people with disabilities in their real life circumstances. Dr. Clark's research programs in healthy aging and in the prevention of pressure ulcers in persons with spinal cord injury have followed a blueprint for translational research which she first developed with colleagues in connection with the USC Well Elderly Study. Initiated in 1993, the Well Elderly Study (RO1 AG11810) was a randomized controlled trial which demonstrated that preventive occupational therapy forestalls the declines associated with typical aging and improves the health of independently living elders.   (Retrieved on January 29, 2015 from http://chan.usc.edu/faculty/directory/Florence_Clark/.)


Q and A

Identify three words that others have used to describe you.
Tenacious, creative, hardworking.

How do you hope to make a difference in the world through research?
By developing cost-effective interventions that prevent chronic disease and disability.

What is one piece of advice you have for individuals considering a career in science and research?
Stay focused and be open to learning from mentors.

Beside your own areas of inquiry, what is one research priority that you believe is important for the future of occupational science and occupational therapy?
Demonstrating the efficacy of occupational therapy intervention approaches in improving quality of life of individuals on the autism spectrum.

Describe the most important role that mentors played in your professional journey.
They were extremely encouraging, believed in my potential, and trusted that I was highly motivated to serve the public good.

Identify a favorite occupation that renews you outside of your work.
Reading.

What has been the most surprising or rewarding aspects of a career in science and research?
I have been surprised to discover that components of interventions I assumed were accounting for certain beneficial effects were irrelevant.  What has been most rewarding is providing evidence that interventions we develop actively produce positive health outcomes cost-effectively in underserved, ethnically diverse populations.


Selected References

Blanche, EI, Fogelberg, D, Diaz, J, Carlson, M, & Clark, F. (2011). Manualization of occupational therapy interventions: Illustrations from the Pressure Ulcer Prevention Research Program. The American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 65, (6), 711-719.

Clark, F. (1993). Occupation Embedded in a Real Life: Interweaving Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy: 1993 Eleanor Clark Slagle Lecture. The American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 47, (12), 1067-1078.

Clark, F, Azen, SP, Zemke, R, Jackson, J, Carlson, M, Mandel, D, Hay, J, Josephson, K, Cherry, B, Hessel, C, Palmer, J & Lipson, L.  (1997 Oct 22-29).  Occupational therapy for independent-living older adults. A randomized controlled trial. JAMA, 278, 321-1326.

Clark, F, Jackson, J, Carlson, M, Chou, CP, Cherry, BJ, Jordan-Marsh, M, Knight, BG, Mandel, D, Blanchard, J, Granger, DA, Wilcox, RR, Lai, MY, White, B, Hay, J, Lam, C, Marterella, A & Azen, S. P.   (2012). Effectiveness of a lifestyle intervention in promoting the well-being of independently living older people: results of the Well Elderly 2 Randomised Controlled Trial. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 66, 782-790.  

Ghaisas, S, Pyatak, EA, Blanche, E, Blanchard, J, Clark, F; PUPS II Study Group.  (2015 Jan-Feb). Lifestyle changes and pressure ulcer prevention in adults with spinal cord injury in the pressure ulcer prevention study lifestyle intervention. The American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 69(1):6901290020p1-6901290020p10. doi: 10.5014/ajot.2015.012021.

Sherrilene Classen, PhD, MPH, OTR/L, FAOTA, FAGSA

2012

Sherrilene Classen, PhD, MPH, OTR/L, FAOTA, FAGSA

Dr. Classen is Professor and Chair, Department of Occupational Therapy, College of Public Health and Health Professions, University of Florida, Founding Director of Western and UF’s international, post-professional distance learning Master of Clinical Science in Driving Rehabilitation Therapy (MClSc DRT) program; Director of the University of Florida’s Institute for Mobility, Activity and Participation and an Extraordinary Professor at Stellenbosch University, Cape Town, South Africa.  She has been the Editor of OTJR: Occupation, Participation and Health since 2015.  

Click here for Dr. Classen's Google Scholar Page.


Dr. Classen's research interests include:

  • Development of measurement tools for driver screening and/or assessment
  • Evaluation and intervention of:
    • Older drivers
    • Drivers with neurological conditions (Parkinson's Disease and Returning Combat Veterans with TBI and/or Post Traumatic Stress Disorder
    • Healthy teens
    • Teens with Autism Spectrum Disorder or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
  • Driving simulation
  • Driving cessation

 

Q and A

Identify three words that others have used to describe you.
Competent, innovative, energetic.

How do you hope to make a difference in the world through research?

  • Continue to make excellent contributions to the science of driving rehabilitation
  • Provide knowledge translation of driving rehabilitation science to occupational therapy practitioners (and others) to ensure best practices
  • Training 1000s of therapists, worldwide, in a newly established post-professional Master's Program in Driving Rehabilitation Therapy, to build capacity through the globe, in providing driving and community mobility services.

What is one piece of advice you have for individuals considering a career in science and research?

  • Create a bold vision that embodies your ultimate purpose
  • Plan action steps (types and mechanisms of grants, publications, conference presentations) purposefully-starting with the end in mind
  • Be true to yourself, appreciate your mentors, respect your colleagues, and support those who are looking up to you
  • Expect disappointments, manage them, and be grateful for them, for they do make one stronger
  • Nurture those who you love-they are your safe harbor
  • Seek excellence
  • Beside your own areas of inquiry, what is one research priority that you believe is important for the future of occupational science and occupational therapy?
  • Ensure our measures are valid and interventions are effective.

Describe the most important role that mentors played in your professional journey.
Identifying potential in me and providing me with opportunities to pursue a variety of scientific or leadership roles.

Identify a favorite occupation that renews you outside of your work.
Road cycling, cross-country skiing, theater, spending time in Cape Town, South Africa.

What has been the most surprising or rewarding aspects of a career in science and research?
Embarking upon a task -- driven by a bold vision-- and experiencing how one becomes a co-creator in knowledge generation.     


Selected References

Classen, S., Velozo, C., Winter, S.M., Wang, Y., Bedard, M. (2015). Psychometrics of the Fitness-to-Drive Screening Measure. The Occupational Therapy Journal of Research: Occupation, Participation and Health, 35(1), 42-52.

Classen, S., Holmes, J., Alvarez, L., Loew, K., Mulvagh, A., Rienas, K., Walton V., He, W. (2015). Clinical assessments as predictors of primary on-road outcomes in Parkinson’s disease. OTJR: Occupation, Participation and Health, 35 (3), 1-8. DOI: 10.1177/1539449215601118

Classen, S., Monahan M., Auten, B and Yarney, K.A. (2014). Evidence based review of rehabilitation interventions for medically at risk older drivers. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 68(4), 107-114.

Helen S. Cohen, EdD, OTR, FAOTA

2003

Helen S. Cohen, EdD, OTR, FAOTA

Dr. Cohen is Professor, Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston.  She is the 2014 recipient of the Eleanor Clarke Slagle Lectureship and delivered her lecture, A career in inquiry, at AOTA's 95th Annual Conference & Expo, in Nashville on Friday, April 17, 2015.  This excerpt from the AOTA 2014 Awards brochure describes Dr. Cohen's research and practice interests.  (Retrieved on January 31, 2015 from (http://www.aota.org/-/media/Corporate/Files/EducationCareers/Awards/By-Year/2014-AOTA-AOTF-Award-Recipients.pdf.)


Dr. Helen S. Cohen receives the Eleanor Clarke Slagle Lectureship Award for her scholarly research, clinical practice, and teaching, which has been instrumental in developing strong evidence and expanding the scope of practice for occupational therapists in the area of vestibular rehabilitation. Dr. Cohen has presented internationally to therapists and physicians on how vestibular dysfunction reduces independence and participation in personal self-care skills and instrumental activities of daily living, and her work has provided evidence about the value of vestibular rehabilitation programs and occupational therapy for clients with many different types of vestibular disorders. Her collaborative work with investigators in the Neuroscience Research Laboratory at NASA/Johnson Space Center has provided an occupational therapist's perspective on specific on-going research projects and on general recommendations for the neuroscience research program for space exploration.


Q and A

Identify three words that others have used to describe you.
Hardworking, focused, intellectual.

How do you hope to make a difference in the world through research?
With greater knowledge comes the power to give better care, to improve the lives of our patients.

What is one piece of advice you have for individuals considering a career in science and research?
Be focused on one area of interest and learn everything you can about it.

Beside your own areas of inquiry, what is one research priority that you believe is important for the future of occupational science and occupational therapy?
Research related to the many problems of aging. The population is aging; if we are going to have a significant role in the care of seniors then we need to be involved in research on all aspects of aging and care of elderly people, from behavioral mechanisms of motor problems and treatment of age-related weakness and balance disorders to the psychosocial aspects of care.

Describe the most important role that mentors played in your professional journey.
Every teacher, professor, mentoring therapist has had advice and has served as a role model in some way.  Even negative feedback has been useful to tell me how I appear to others and what I need to work on.

Identify a favorite occupation that renews you outside of your work.
Walking, observing nature.

What has been the most surprising or rewarding aspects of a career in science and research?

  • Great people I have met.
  • The opportunity to participate in fascinating research  in other areas of science that were not my initial focus, but for which my skills and background have been appropriate. Also, the opportunity to influence the direction of the science in grant reviews and manuscript reviews.
  • The opportunity to travel to interesting places for scientific meetings.


Selected References

Cohen, HS.  (Ed.).  (1999). Neuroscience for rehabilitation. (2nd Ed.).  Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott; Williams & Wilkins.

Cohen, HS. (2014). Use of the Vestibular Disorders Activities of Daily Living Scale to describe functional limitations in patients with vestibular disorders. Journal of Vestibular Research, 24, 33-38.

Cohen, HS, Burkhardt, A, Cronin, GW, McGuire, MJ.  (2006). Specialized knowledge and skills in adult vestibular rehabilitation for occupational therapy practice. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 60, 669-678.

Reschke, MF, Cohen, HS, Cerisano, JM, Clayton, JA, Cromwell, R, Danielson, RW, Hwang, EY, Tingen, C, Allen, JR, Tomko, DL. (2014). Effects of sex and gender on adaptation tospace: neurosensory systems. Journal of Women's Health (Larchmont), 23, 959-962.

Wendy J. Coster, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA

1997

Wendy J. Coster, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA

Dr. Coster is Professor and Chair, Department of Occupational Therapy, Boston University Sargent College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Boston as well as Director, Behavior and Health Program, and Director, Patient/Clinic Reported Outcomes Core, Boston Rehabilitation Outcomes Center.  Dr. Coster is a recipient of the AOTF A. Jean Ayres Award.  In 2007, she received the Eleanor Clarke Slagle Lectureship, AOTA's highest academic honor.  Currently, Dr. Coster is chair of the AOTF Scientific Advisory Council. She was named one of the 100 Influential People in Occupational Therapy by AOTA.

Dr. Coster's description of her scholarly, research and/or practice interests from The Sargent College website: (Retrieved on January 29, 2015 from http://www.bu.edu/sargent/profile/wendy-coster/.)

The primary focus of my research program is the development of conceptually grounded, psychometrically sound measures of activity, participation, and environment.  My overarching concern is to create measures for the field of rehabilitation that appropriately reflect individuals' ability to engage in activities and participate in situations that are important for their satisfaction and well-being.  Some of these measures are directed to practice, i.e. to provide assessment that gather information on the issues of greatest relevance to consumers.  Others are designed to support outcomes measurement purposes (either research or program evaluation).  Although my primary clinical work has been with children, my work extends to adult populations as well.  The long term goal of this work is the development of a series of measures that help to advance rehabilitation science and support best practice.


Q and A

Identify three words that others have used to describe you.
Organized, patient, a listener.

How do you hope to make a difference in the world through research?
I hope that my work enables others to look at people with disabilities and to see what they can do and to think creatively about how to enable meaningful participation.

What is one piece of advice you have for individuals considering a career in science and research?
Network! You never know when one of those connections turns out to be the key that opens a new door for you.

Beside your own areas of inquiry, what is one research priority that you believe is important for the future of occupational science and occupational therapy?
Understanding more about the cognitive and emotional underpinnings of everyday life activities.

Describe the most important role that mentors played in your professional journey.
Mentors taught me "the ropes" - the things you need to do to build a successful career that you don't learn in courses or by reading books.

Identify a favorite occupation that renews you outside of your work.
I love walking in the woods with my dogs, in all seasons - although not in the rain.

What has been the most surprising or rewarding aspects of a career in science and research?
I never expected to find measurement so fascinating and I've been gratified to see the measures I've worked on really change both practice and research.  

 

Selected References

Chang, FH, Coster, WJ & Helfrich, CA. (2013). Community participation measures for people with disabilities: a systematic review of content from an international classification of functioning, disability and health perspective. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 94(4):771-781.

Chang, FH, Helfrich, CA & Coster, WJ. (2013). Psychometric properties of the Practical Skills Test (PST). The American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 67, (2), 246-253.

Coster, WJ. (2013). Making the best match: Selecting outcome measures for clinical trials and outcome studies. The American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 67, (2), 162-170.

Coster, WJ.  (2008). Eleanor Clarke Slagle Lecture: Embracing ambiguity: facing the challenge of measurement.  The American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 62, 743-752. 

Patricia Davies, PhD, OTR, FAOTA

2010

Patricia Davies, PhD, OTR, FAOTA

Dr. Davies is a Professor in the Department of Occupational Therapy with a joint appointment with the Department of Psychology and Human Development and Family Studies at Colorado State University (CSU). She is also a faculty member in the Molecular, Cellular and Integrated Neuroscience Program at CSU.

Dr. Davies is Director of the Brainwaves Research Laboratory at CSU. The focus of her research is to understand the development of neurophysiological mechanisms that underlie cognitive and motor behaviors in children with and without disorders. By using electroencephalography (EEG), event-related potentials (ERPs), and behavioral testing, she is able to relate brain activity to sensory and cognitive functional performance. (Retrieved on March 17, 2015 from http://www.ot.chhs.colostate.edu/faculty-staff/patricia_davies.aspx.)


Selected References

Bellows, LL, Davies, PL, Anderson, J & Kennedy, C. (2013). Effectiveness of a physical activity intervention for Head Start preschoolers: A randomized intervention study. The American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 67, 28-36.  

Chang, WP, Gavin, WJ & Davies, PL.  (2012). Bandpass filter settings differentially affect measurement of P50 sensory gating in children and adults. Clinical Neurophysiolology, 123, 2264-2272.  

Gavin, WJ, Dotseth, A, Roush, KK, Smith, CA, Spain, HD & Davies PL.  (2011). Electroencephalography in children with and without sensory processing disorders during auditory perception. The American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 65, 370-377. 

12345

Theme picker