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Welcome to Pi Theta Epsilon!

Pi Theta Epsilon (PTE) is a specialized honor society for occupational therapy students and alumni. Its mission is to promote research and scholarship among occupational therapy students. PTE recognizes and encourages superior scholarship among students enrolled in accredited educational programs across the United States.

Mission

The mission of Pi Theta Epsilon is to support the practice of occupational sciences and the practice of authentic occupational therapy by promoting research, leadership, and scholarly activities by its members. In this way, the organization serves not only the profession, but helps to ensure quality healthcare services for the general public.

Purpose

The purposes of Pi Theta Epsilon (PTE), as stated in the society's constitution, are to:

  • Recognize and encourage scholastic excellence of occupational therapy students
  • Contribute to the advancement of the field of occupational therapy through scholarly activities, such as research development, continuing education, and information exchange between student and alumni members; and
  • Provide a vehicle for students enrolled in accredited programs in occupational therapy to exchange information and to collaborate regarding scholarly activities.

Ideals 

  • Stimulate, recognize, and reward clinical practice that demonstrates the principles of authentic occupational therapy; and
  • Stimulate, recognize and reward educational systems that support excellence in scholarship, research, and critical thinking (related to authentic OT) in its students and faculty.

For example, we want to support educational systems which prepare students to:

  • Become practitioners of authentic occupational therapy;
  • Endeavor to conduct research;
  • Strive to attain the ideals of PTE; and
  • Stimulate research through a program of awards and mentorship. 

History

Pi Theta Epsilon began at the University of New Hampshire in the fall of 1958.  In 1987, the American Student Committee of the Occupational Therapy Association (ASCOTA), now the Association of Student Delegates (ASD), surveyed existing chapters about standards to establish and maintain a national honor society. In 1988, the Board of Directors of the American Occupational Therapy Foundation agreed to provide sponsorship and assistance in achieving recognition as a national honor society.  An advisory committee was established and an operating budget was provided to support Pi Theta Epsilon activities through 1994. Work was undertaken to increase the number of chapters, register a logo, and become recognized by the Association of College Honor Societies (ACHS). By March 1995, there were 43 operational chapters in the United States.  In 2008, the AOTF Bylaws were amended to include the PTE president as a voting member of the Foundation Board of Directors. There are currently 120 active chapters. 

Pi Theta Epsilon is governed by a Constitution that is upheld by elected officers who constitute a national executive committee. The annual meeting of chapter delegates is held at the AOTA Annual Conference.

Become a Partner or Sponsor

By partnering with PTE, you'll support the practice of occupational sciences and the practice of authentic occupational therapy by promoting research, leadership, and scholarly activities by its members.

Contact pte@aotf.org for more information.

PTE: Officers

PTE President Pooja A. Patel, DrOT, OTR/L

PTE President Pooja A. Patel, DrOT, OTR/L
Term: 2017-2022

Dr. Patel is an acute care occupational therapist at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago, Illinois serving a mostly geriatric population. She graduated from the University of Sciences in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in May 2017. After graduating, she spent a year as a traveling OT, gaining experiences in acute care and acute inpatient rehab. Her primary areas of interest are research, academia, program development, and entrepreneurship to further the profession of occupational therapy with respect and dignity. Pooja is a strong presenter with consistent state- and national-level poster presentations, formal and informal board meetings, and student mentorship. By holding this office, she believes she will fulfill her desire to work towards her vision of occupational therapy being recognized, understood, and respected as are its allied healthcare counterparts. Outside of the OT world, Pooja serves as a lead curriculum developer on a team developing a health education program for a nonprofit organization serving under-served youths in India. As PTE president, Pooja also serves as the PTE representative on the AOTF Board of Trustees.

PTE Vice President Ali Lannom, OTD, OTR/L, CEES, CLIPP

PTE Vice President Ali Lannom, OTD, OTR/L, CEES, CLIPP
Term: 2021-2023

Ali Lannom (OTD, OTR/L, CEES, CLIPP) is a graduate of Huntington University’s doctorate in occupational therapy program, where she focused in upper extremity and prosthetic rehabilitation. Ali completed her doctoral capstone in Nashville, TN, where she advocated for occupational therapy and individuals with limb loss both locally and internationally. During her time, Ali collaborated with prosthetists, surgeons, neuromodulation specialists, and non-profits to improve functional outcomes and quality of life in upper and lower extremity amputees. To better understand prosthetic technology and rehabilitation, she has obtained 25 certificates from various prosthetic manufacturers and therapy specialists. Ali created the Living in MOTion project to be a resource for individuals with limb loss, therapy students, and therapists to provide free educational information on health, wellness, and adaptations. Through her initiatives, she raised over $20,000 to provide prosthetic devices for those in need, assisted with prosthetic device development, and created the Someone Else’s Shoes #SESChalellenge that went viral on social media outlets.  Ali is now employed at STAR Physical Therapy in Nashville, Tennessee and is developing the state’s first comprehensive prosthetic rehabilitation program.

 

 

PTE Secretary Lauren McClung, OTD, OTR/L

PTE Secretary Lauren McClung, OTD, OTR/L
Term: 2020-2022

Lauren McClung graduated from Creighton University with her Doctorate of Occupational Therapy in May 2020. At Creighton, Lauren served as the Alpha Iota chapter president, where she promoted scholarship and research with Alpha Iota chapter alumni to present to current members. Currently, Lauren works in an outpatient pediatric clinic. She has strong interests in Sensory Processing Disorder and Autism. In the community, Lauren continues to advocate and educate community partners on Sensory Processing Disorder. As secretary, Lauren hopes to increase communication and engagement with all members on a national level. She also hopes to increase engagement with Pi Theta alumni and promote innovative research. Lauren is looking forward to collaborating with the national board and current members to increase scholarship in the occupational therapy field.

PTE Treasurer J.M. Trevino, MS

PTE Treasurer J.M. Trevino, MS
Term: 2021-2023

J. M. Treviño graduated from the Historically Black University, Howard University (HU) in Washington, D.C. (Beta Alpha chapter), with her Master of Science in Occupational Therapy in 2020. OT is her second career, as she spent a decade providing psychosocial rehabilitation and case management services to children and adolescents with severe mental health conditions. It was through her previous work that she found OT and immediately began taking prerequisite courses to apply to graduate school. While at HU, Jay completed her thesis on the role of OT with survivors of sexual violence, as well as a research internship at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Her OT areas of interests include mental health, academia, research, advocacy, legislation, and diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI). As treasurer, Jay strives to promote the mission of PTE, fulfill the functions of the role as treasurer, increase communications between executive board members and chapters, and increase scholarship opportunities for underrepresented/marginalized persons within OT.