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AOTF Staff Members

Susan Garber, MA, OTR, FAOTA

2006

Susan Garber, MA, OTR, FAOTA

Ms. Garber is a Professor in the Department of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. She has dedicated her career to researching prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers in people with spinal cord injuries and has made significant contributions to this field. She joined the faculty at Baylor after working as a full-time clinical occupational therapist. She spent 19 years conducting research at The Institute of Rehabilitation and Research (TIRR) as assistant director for research and education in the department of occupational therapy and then 10 years conducting research through the Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Her research interests are in the areas of spinal cord injury, prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers, rehabilitation outcomes, technology and rehabilitation, and patient and family education. (Retrieved on April 28, 2015 from https://www.bcm.edu/people/view/b2559e16-ffed-11e2-be68-080027880ca6)

She received her bachelor of science in occupational therapy from Columbia University and her master of arts in occupational therapy at Texas Women’s University.

Ms. Garber is a recipient of the AOTA Eleanor Clarke Slagle Lectureship Award, and is a Fellow of the American Occupational Therapy Association as well as the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Ms. Garber was named one of the 100 Influential People of Occupational Therapy by AOTA.

Ms. Garber is a member of the AOTF Board of Trustees and was named one of the 100 Influential People of Occupational Therapy by AOTA.


Q and A

Identify three words that others have used to describe you.  
Conscientious, focused, precise.

How do you hope to make a difference in the world through research?
Research Improves the health and recovery of patients/clients by questioning and testing existing approaches and exploring opportunities for their enhancement or effectiveness. I hope to teach health professionals how to evaluate and treat pain, especially in vulnerable populations like youths with physical disabilities.

What is one piece of advice you have for individuals considering a career in science and research?
Actually, there are two: first: have enough clinical experience to determine area(s) of interest in order to ask the right questions; second, initially, identify a mentor whose work you admire and whose work interests you. Do not try to "plug yourself into" a research project that is of no interest to you.  

Beside your own areas of inquiry, what is one research priority that you believe is important for the future of occupational science and occupational therapy?
Again, there are two: development of research skills through structured academic courses as well as during clinical fieldwork where all students should be required to develop a research project; identify a mentor with a track record in research design and implementation.

Describe the most important role that mentors played in your professional journey.
Initially, mentors outside the field of occupational therapy (engineers) included me, supported my growth and development as a researcher and challenged me to adapt traditional occupational therapy interventions to solve the clinical problems at the core of the Rehabilitation Engineering Center (effect of pressure on tissue), problems not usually part of the occupational therapy purview.

Identify a favorite occupation that renews you outside of your work.   
Travel; reading; spending time with my 5 grandchildren.

What has been the most surprising or rewarding aspects of a career in science and research?
In part, through my efforts, I have managed to bring a focus on the creation of new knowledge to the profession of occupational therapy. It is most rewarding that I have contributed to a body of knowledge that now is included in the armamentarium of innovative solutions to the clinical problems which our patients face daily.


Selected References

Clark, F, Pyatak, EA, Carlson, M, Blanche, EI, Vigen, C, Hay, J, Mallinson, T, Blanchard, J, Unger, JB, Garber, SL, Diaz, J, Florindez, LI, Atkins, M, Rubayi, S & Azen, SP; PUPS Study Group.  (2014). Implementing trials of complex interventions in community settings: the USC-Rancho Los Amigos pressure ulcer prevention study (PUPS). Clinical Trials. 11, 218-229.  

Pyatak, EA, Blanche, EI, Garber, SL, Diaz, J, Blanchard, J, Florindez, L & Clark FA.  (2013), Conducting intervention research among underserved populations: lessons learned and recommendations for researchers. Archives in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 94, 1190-1198.

Wu, GA, Garber, SL & Bogie, KM.  (2015), Utilization and user satisfaction with alternating pressure air cushions: a pilot study of at-risk individuals with spinal cord injury. Disability and Rehabilitation Assistive Technology, 2015 Mar 24:1-5. [Epub ahead of print]  

A. Jean Ayres*, PhD, OTR, FAOTA

1983

A. Jean Ayres*, PhD, OTR, FAOTA

1920 - 1989

"The sensory integration (SI) specialty was originally developed by A. Jean Ayres, PhD, OTR, who was both an occupational therapist and an educational psychologist. A former member of the USC occupational therapy faculty, she developed a theoretical framework, a set of standardized tests (today known as the Sensory Integration and Praxis Tests"), and a clinical approach for identification and remediation of SI problems in children. Her publications on sensory integration span a 30-year period from the 1960's through the 1980's, and include psychometric studies as well as clinical trials and single case studies."  (Retrieved on December 18, 2014 from http://chan.usc.edu/academics/sensory-integration.) 

 

 

Selected References

Ayres, AJ. (1963). Eleanor Clarke Slagle Lecture: The development of perceptual-motor abilities: A theoretical basis for treatment of dysfunction. The American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 17, 221-225.
Ayres, A. J. (1972). Sensory Integration and Learning Disorders. Los Angeles, CA: Western Psychological Services.
Ayres, AJ. (1972). Types of sensory integrative dysfunction among disabled learners. The American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 26, 13-18.

Bernadette Nedelec, PhD, BScOT(C),

2018

Bernadette Nedelec, PhD, BScOT(C),

Dr. Nedelec is an Associate Professor and the former Director of the Occupational Therapy Program, School of Physical and Occupational Therapy at McGill University, Montréal, Québec, Canada. Her research interests focus on the rehabilitation of people who have sustained a major burn injury with a particular interest in the evaluation and treatment of hypertrophic scar. The formation of hypertrophic scar is considered one of the most important long-term consequences of a major burn injury leading to impairments, activity limitations and participation restrictions. Research projects have evaluated the clinical instruments used to quantify hypertrophic scar and its associated symptoms, the efficacy of treatment interventions employed to minimize hypertrophic scar and its associated sequelae, practice issues related to evidence-informed practice, ensuring burn therapist competency, and the delivery of best practice rehabilitation, as well as the comprehensive evaluation of the short- and long-term outcomes associated with burn injuries.


Q AND A

Identify three words that others have used to describe you.
Perseverant, hard-working, erudite

How do you hope to make a difference in the world through research?
Burn survivor rehabilitation specific research is scarce. Recent medical and surgical research advances make it possible for virtually all patients, even those with massive burn injuries, to survive. We need to provide evidence for rehabilitation interventions that will optimize function so burn survivors can participate in meaningful occupations and enjoy good quality of life.

What is one piece of advice you have for individuals considering a career in science and research?
Surround yourself with a like-minded, but diverse team who have expertise in areas that will complement your research program. Working with people who will support you, and at the same time challenge and stimulate your thinking, is essential to optimizing your research program.

Beside your own areas of inquiry, what is one research priority that you believe is important for the future of occupational science and occupational therapy?
Expert occupational therapist working in physical medicine seamlessly incorporate the evaluation and treatment of psychosocial issues into their practice. This often times goes undocumented and is undervalued. Making this treatment explicit, researching it value and improving current practice needs to be a research priority. There are also long-term health benefits associated with enabling people’s ability to engage in meaningful occupations. Occupational therapy researchers need to quantify these benefits, particularly from an economic perspective, so that the value of what we do is unquestionable.

Describe the most important role that mentors played in your professional journey.
Mentors have played an enormous role in my academic career. They have come in many forms including colleagues, family, friends, patients, and students. They taught me the value and the sustaining power of the love of learning, to strive for excellence in all we do, to never compromise my integrity, and to always prioritize the overall goal of improving the outcome of the patients that we serve. They also modeled our responsibility to give back to the systems that support us, including supporting the development of students and junior researchers.

Identify a favorite occupation that renews you outside of your work.
Spending time with family, my children in particular, rejuvenates me and helps me to put things into perspective. Staying connected with nature is a nurturing force in my life.

What has been the most surprising or rewarding aspects of a career in science and research?
The thing that has been most surprising for me is the never-ending excitement of learning, and the thrill of working with, and learning from, the amazingly talented, crazy smart people I have had the privilege to work with.


REFERENCES

Nedelec, B., Correa, J.A., Rachelska, G., & Armour, A. (2008). Quantitative Measurement of Hypertrophic Scar: Intrarater Reliability, Sensitivity, and Specificity, Journal of Burn Care & Research, 29, 489-500. doe: 10.1097/BCR.0b013e3181710869

Nedelec, B., Correa, J.A., Rachelska, G., Armour, A., & LaSalle, L. (2008) Measurement of Hypertrophic Scar: Interrater Reliability and Concurrent Validity. Journal of Burn Care & Research, 29, 501-511. doe: 10.1097/BCR.0b013e3181710881

Nedelec, B., Correa, J.A., de Oliveira, A., LaSalle, L., Perrault, I. (2014) Longitudinal burn scar quantification. Burns, 40,1504-1512. doi:10.1016/j.burns.2014.03.002

Nedelec, B., Calva, V., Chouinard, A., Couture, M., Godbout, E., de Oliveira, A., & LaSalle, L. (2016) Somatosensory Rehabilitation for Neuropathic Pain in Burn Survivors: A Case Series. Journal of Burn Care & Research, 37, e37–e46. doi:10.1097/BCR.0000000000000321

Nguyen, N.T., Lorrain, M., Pognon-Hanna, J.N., Elfassy, C., Calva, V., de Oliveira, A., & Nedelec, B. (2016) Barriers and facilitators to work reintegration and burn survivors’ perspectives on educating work colleagues. Burns, 42, 1477–1486 doi:10.1016/j.burns.2016.05.014

Ching-yi Wu, ScD, OTR

2018

Ching-yi Wu, ScD, OTR

Dr. Wu is a full professor in the Department of Occupational Therapy and the Graduate Institute of Behavioral Science in the College of Medicine at Chang Gung University in Taoyuan City, Taiwan with a practice appointment as Adjunct Occupational Therapist in Chang Gung University Hospital. Dr. Wu’s research interest mainly lies in neurorehabilitation after stroke and the application of motor control study in stroke rehabilitation, together with examining the psychometric and clinimetric properties of outcome evaluations used in efficacy study. She has combined electrophysiological stimulation with task-oriented approaches; for example, transcranial direct current stimulation combined with mirror therapy for facilitating neural reorganization and motor recovery. Dr. Wu’s research has used kinematic analysis and functional magnetic resonance imaging to study the nature of improved movement control and the possible neural mechanisms underlying improvement. Dr. Wu has published over 172 journal articles and is the Principle Investigator of the Human-Machine Interface in the Healthy Aging Center at Chang Gung University which facilitates the application of technology in rehabilitation and occupational therapy practice.


Q AND A

Identify three words that others have used to describe you.
Persistent, Action-oriented, Interdisciplinary

How do you hope to make a difference in the world through research?
I hope to make a difference in clinical practice in terms of optimizing the benefits of interventions for persons with physical dysfunction. Research on the mechanism and efficacy of theory-based and innovative interventions and on searching for the most appropriate clients to the specific approach is critical to achieve this aim. I also hope to make a difference in knowledge and practice by incorporating contemporary technology such as non-invasive brain stimulation, artificial intelligence to clinical decision making, monitoring, evaluation, and intervention of occupational therapy.

What is one piece of advice you have for individuals considering a career in science and research?
Be enthusiastic and interested in exploring unknown phenomenon.

Beside your own areas of inquiry, what is one research priority that you believe is important for the future of occupational science and occupational therapy?
Integrate artificial intelligence and telerehabilitation into OT knowledge and practice for health care and promotion.

Describe the most important role that mentors played in your professional journey.
I am fortunate to be surrounded by respectful scholars who are devoted to research and professional development. What I learned and I’d like to pass on to the young researcher or scholars is to sharpen your thinking and create all kinds of possibility for enriching the field of interest.

Identify a favorite occupation that renews you outside of your work.
Travel, cuisine, hiking

What has been the most surprising or rewarding aspects of a career in science and research? The most rewarding aspect is to mentor graduate students and postdoctoral fellows and collaborate with colleagues to go through a series of the research programs finding out the possible/temporary answers to the research question and contributing to establishment of the scientific base of occupational therapy.

 

REFERENCES

Chen, H., Lin, K., Liing, R., Wu, C.-Y., & Chen, C.-L. (2015). Kinematic measures of arm-trunk movements during unilateral and bilateral reaching predict clinically important change in perceived arm use in daily activities after intensive stroke rehabilitation. Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, 12, 84-94. doi:10.1186/s12984-015-0075-8.

Wu, C.-Y., Chen, C.-L., Tsai, W., Lin, K. (2007). A randomized controlled trial of modified constraint-induced movement therapy for elderly stroke survivors: Changes in motor impairment, daily functioning, and quality of life. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 88, 273-8. doi:10.1016/j.apmr.2006.11.021.

Wu, C.-Y., Chuang L-L., Lin K-C., Chen, H., & Tsay, P. (2011). Randomized trial of distributed constraint-induced therapy versus bilateral arm training for the rehabilitation of upper-limb Motor control and function after stroke. Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, 25, 130-139. doi:10.1177/1545968310380686.

Wu, C-Y, Chuang L-L, Lin K-C, Lee S-D, & Hong W-H. (2011). Responsiveness, minimal detectable change, and minimal clinically important difference of the Nottingham Extended Activities of Daily Living scale in patients with improved performance after stroke rehabilitation. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 92, 1281-1287. doi:10.1016/j.apmr.2011.03.008.

Wu, C.-Y., Chuang, I.-C., Ma, H.-I., Lin, K.-C., & Chen, C.-L. (2016). Validity and responsiveness of the Revised Nottingham Sensation Assessment for outcome evaluation in stroke rehabilitation. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 70, 7002290040. doi: 10.5014/ajot.2016.018390.

Wu, C.-Y., Lin K-C, Chen, H.-C., Chen, I.-H., & Hong, W.-H. (2007) Effects of Modified Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy on Movement Kinematics and Daily Function in Patients With Stroke: A Kinematic Study of Motor Control Mechanisms. Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, 21, 460 doi:10.1177/1545968307303411

Wu, C.-Y., Wong, M., Lin, K., Chen, H.-C. (2001). Effects of task goal and personal preference on seated reaching kinematics after stroke. Stroke, 32, 70-76. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1161/01.STR.32.1.70.

Gary Kielhofner*, DrPH, OTR, FAOTA

1984

Gary Kielhofner*, DrPH, OTR, FAOTA

At the time of his death in 2010, Dr. Kielhofner was Professor and Wade-Meyer Chair,  Department of Occupational Therapy, College of Applied Health Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago.  Dr. Kielhofner is, of course, almost synonymous with his theoretical model -- the Model of Human Occupation (MOHO). In their tribute to Dr. Kielhofner, Drs. Braveman, Fisher, Suarez-Balcazar wrote the following (Braveman, Fisher, Suarez-Balcazar, 2010. p. 829):

In 1980, Gary and Janice Burke introduced a theoretical model under the mentorship of Mary Reilly to fill a gap in understanding and addressing clients with disabilities' psychosocial challenges in the rehabilitation process (Kielhofner & Burke, 1980). This groundbreaking theory, the Model of Human Occupation (MOHO), is currently the most widely used theory in occupational therapy research and practice. This model presented practitioners with a conceptual framework and practical tools to guide their assessment and reasoning process, effect change, and measure the impact of their intervention. It guides occupational therapy practitioners to consider the personal values and interests, roles and responsibilities, and environmental contexts of each client. The model also provided a foundation for program development and research initiatives. Gary's book, Model of Human Occupation: Theory and Application, now in its fourth edition, has served to educate generations of occupational therapy students (Kielhofner, 2008). More than 500 articles, books, and chapters have reported research, case studies, intervention approaches, and programs based on MOHO.

In 2011, Dr. Kielhofner, received the American Occupational Therapy Association's Award of Merit (posthumously). AOTA created the The Gary Kielhofner Emerging Leader Award and awarded it for the first time in 2014 to Rachel Dargatz. AOTF created The Gary W. Kielhofner Graduate Fellowship in Occupational Therapy to also further his impact. Dr. Kielhofner was named one of the 100 Influential People in Occupational Therapy by AOTA.


REFERENCES


Braveman, B., Fisher, G., & Suarez-Balcazar, Y. (2010). IN MEMORIAM-- "Achieving the ordinary things": a tribute to Gary Kielhofner. The American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 64, 828-831.  

Kielhofner, G.  (2008). Model of Human Occupation: Theory and application.  (4th Ed.)  Baltimore, MD: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Kielhofner, G. (1980). A Model of Human Occupation, Part 2. Ontogenesis from the perspective of temporal adaptation. The American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 34, 657-663.

Kielhofner, G. (1980). A Model of Human Occupation, Part 3, Benign and vicious cycles. The American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 34, 731-737.  

Kielhofner, G & Burke, JP. (1980). A Model of Human Occupation, Part 1. Conceptual framework and content. The American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 34, (9), 572-581.  

Kielhofner, G, Burke, JP & Igi, CH. (1980). A Model of Human Occupation, Part 4. Assessment and intervention. The American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 34, 777-788.  

Lee, SW, Kielhofner, G, Morley, M, Heasman, D, Garnham, M, Willis, S & Taylor, RR. (2012). Impact of using the Model of Human Occupation: a survey of occupational therapy mental health practitioners' perceptions. Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, 19, (5), 450-456.  

Lee, SW, Morley, M, Taylor, RR, Kielhofner, G, Garnham, M, Heasman, D & Forsyth, K. (2011). The development of care pathways and packages in mental health based on the Model of Human Occupation Screening Tool. The British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 74, (6), 284-294.

Taylor, R. R., O'Brien, J., Kielhofner, G., Lee, S. W., Katz, B., & Mears, C. (2010). The occupational and quality of life consequences of chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis in young people. The British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 73, 524-530. 

Mary Law, PhD, OT(C)

1998

Mary Law, PhD, OT(C)

Dr. Law is Professor in the School of Rehabilitation Science and also associate member of the Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics at McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario. She holds the John and Margaret Lillie Chair in Childhood Disability Research. Dr. Law, an occupational therapist by training, is co-founder of CanChild Centre for Childhood Disability Research, a multidisciplinary research center at McMaster University.

Dr. Law's research centers on the development and validation of client-centered outcome measures, evaluation of occupational therapy interventions with children, the effect of environmental factors on the participation of children with disabilities in day to day activities, and transfer of research knowledge into practice. Dr. Law is the lead author of the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure, a client-centered outcome measure for occupational therapy, and has written books on Client-centered Occupational Therapy, Evidence-based Rehabilitation and Measurement of Occupational Performance. Dr. Law has been chair of the USA NIH Rehabilitation Research Committee and co-editor of Physical and Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics. Honors received nationally and internationally include the Muriel Driver Lectureship, the top award in Canadian Occupational Therapy; the Whittaker Award for pediatric rehabilitation research; Queen's University Legacy of Achievement Alumni Award, and Fellow, Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists. Retrieved on June 2, 2015 from http://www.pearsonclinical.com/authmaors/law-rhy.tml.   


REFERENCES

Law, M. (1991). 1991 Muriel Driver Lecture: The environment: a focus for occupational therapy. The Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy, 58, (4), 171-180.

Law, M, Anaby, D, Imms, C, Teplicky, R & Turner L. (2015). Improving the participation of youth with physical disabilities in community activities: An interrupted time series design. Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, 62, 105-115.  

Law, M & Darrah, J.  (2014). Emerging therapy approaches: an emphasis on function. Journal of Child Neurology, 29, 1101-1107.

Moll, SE, Gewurtz, RE, Krupa, TM, Law, MC, Larivière, N & Levasseur, M.  (2015). "Do-Live-Well": a Canadian framework for promoting occupation, health, and well-being. Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy, 82, 9-23.

Grace T. Baranek, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA

2008

Grace T. Baranek, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA

Grace Baranek is a prolific scholar and internationally renowned expert on sensory features of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). She earned her bachelor's degree in occupational therapy from the University of Illinois at the Medical Center and both her master's and PhD degrees in psychology from the University of Illinois at Chicago. Prior to her 2016 appointment as associate dean and chair of the USC Chan Division, she was a professor and associate chair for research in the Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy Department of Allied Health Sciences at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
 
Beginning in 2003, Dr. Baranek was the Principal Investigator of the Sensory Experiences Project funded by the National Institute Health (NIH) National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD). The 10-year study totaling more than $4.5M in NICHD grant funding aimed to explain the developmental course, mechanisms and functional effects of sensory features in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Sensory features are highly prevalent in children with ASD and may impact daily activities, routines and social participation.
 
During her career, Dr. Baranek has served as either the Principal or Co-Principal Investigator of extramural grants funded by the NIH/NICHD, the U.S. Department of Defense, the U.S. Department of Education, the Autism Speaks Foundation, and the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA). She has been a member of working groups of the National Academy of Science and the NIH to establish guidelines for evidence-based practices for children with ASD.
 
She has co-authored more than 65 peer-reviewed articles in interdisciplinary publications including Autism Research, Autism, the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders and the American Journal of Occupational Therapy (AJOT). She is also the lead author of the First Years Inventory, a screening tool for infants aged 9-15 months who are at risk for a later diagnosis of ASD.
 
In 2016, Dr. Baranek was a co-recipient of the AOTA Cordelia Myers AJOT Best Article Award and in 2013 she received the American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology Editor's Award. (Retrieved on February 27, 2017 from http://chan.usc.edu/faculty/directory/Grace_Baranek)


Selected References

Baranek, GT, Watson, LR, Boyd, BA, Poe, MD, David, FJ & McGuire, L.  (2013). Hyporesponsiveness to social and nonsocial sensory stimuli in children with autism, children with developmental delays, and typically developing children.  Development and Psychopathology, 25, 307-320.

Baranek, GT, Roberts, J., David, FJ, Sideris, J, Mirrett, PL, Hatton, DD & Bailey, D. B. (2008). Developmental trajectories and correlates of sensory processing in young boys with fragile X syndrome. Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics, 28, (1), 79-98.

Little, LM, Sideris, J, Ausderau, K & Baranek, GT.  (2014). Activity participation among children with autism spectrum disorder.  American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 68, 477-485.

Natasha A. Lannin, PhD, BSc(OT), GradDip

2017

Natasha A. Lannin, PhD, BSc(OT), GradDip

Dr. Lannin holds a joint research-only position with Alfred Health (Melbourne) and La Trobe University, and is an honorary Research Fellow at the John Walsh Institute for Rehabilitation Research at The University of Sydney, the George Institute for Global Health and the Florey Institute of Neurosciences and Mental Health. Working within the Alfred Health hospital network, she conducts clinical trials investigating the effectiveness of occupational therapy interventions as well as translation research into improving the long-term outcomes for those living with an acquired brain injury from stroke or traumatic causes. Dr. Lannin is a supervisor of higher research degree students (PhD and Master's). She has published widely in leading journals such as Stroke, Journal of Epidemiology, and Clinical Rehabilitation, and has received competitive research grants from federal government (including NHMRC), state government (including the Transport Accident Commission) and philanthropic organizations (including the National Stroke Foundation).

Read more about Dr. Lannin on her webpage.

 

Q AND A

Identify three words that others have used to describe you.

Dedicated, honest, passionate.

How do you hope to make a difference in the world through research?
At the heart of my research is the goal to increase the efficacy of what occupational therapists do every day with inpatients in rehabilitation, a belief that every patient deserves to receive the most effective services and treatment; the right treatment at the right time. So, I hope to make a difference by defining best practice, by conducting systematic reviews and running clinical trials; as well as conducting mixed methods and epidemiological studies designed to provide greater understanding of the issues as well as the prevalence of the problems, their impact on being able to perform everyday activities and how to best support independence and quality of life after neurological damage. And, most importantly, from seeing these findings translated across into the clinical rehabilitation of adults after brain injury and stroke.

What is one piece of advice you have for individuals considering a career in science and research?
Focus on one area and think carefully about the big issues in that area. You will need to keep coming back to these issues, and try not to sidetracked. Really good ideas translate to good research if they are grounded in real clinical issues, and as a researcher you can make instrumental changes to clinical practice if you remain focused on the issues that you are most passionate about.

Beside your own areas of inquiry, what is one research priority that you believe is important for the future of occupational science and occupational therapy?
Determining the cost-effectiveness of occupational therapy- we have the beginnings of this information in some areas of practice, but our cost-effectiveness is not yet universally known.

Describe the most important role that mentors played in your professional journey.
The role of advocate. My mentors have not only provided advice and support to me directly, they have advocated for me to others which has led to some amazing opportunities for me. In many ways, they have been just as dedicated to my success, as they have their own.

Identify a favorite occupation that renews you outside of your work:
Parenting.

What has been the most surprising or rewarding aspects of a career in science and research?
The most rewarding has been the opportunity to co-design programs and research with consumers, this is what keeps me going. The thought that the work we do is really, really important to the people who I work with.

 

SELECTED REFERENCES

Lannin, N., Carr, B., Allaous, J., Mackenzie, B., Falcon, A., & Tate, R (2014). A randomized controlled trial of the effectiveness of handheld computers for improving everyday memory functioning in patients with memory impairments after acquired brain injury. Clinical Rehabilitation, 28(5), 470–481.

Lannin, N. A., Cusick, A., McCluskey, A., & Herbert, R. D (2007).  Effects of Splinting on Wrist Contracture after Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Trial.  Stroke. 38, 111-116.  

Laver, K., Lannin, N. A.,  Bragge, P.,  Hunter, P.,  Holland, A., E., Tavender, E.,  O’Connor, D.,  Khan, F., Teasell, R.,  & Gruen Laver, R  et al (2014). Organising health care services for people with an acquired brain injury: an overview of systematic reviews and randomised controlled trials.  BMC Health Services Research, 14, 397.   

Gonçalves-Bradley, D.C., Lannin, N.A., Clemson, L.M., Cameron, I.D., & Shepperd, S (2016).  Discharge planning from hospital. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 1. Art. No.: CD000313. 

M. Carolyn Baum, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA

2006

M. Carolyn Baum, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA

Dr. Baum is Elias Michael Director and Professor of Occupational Therapy, Neurology, and Social Work, School of Medicine and Brown School, Washington University, St, Louis, Missouri. Her clinical interests are in the areas of aging, occupational performance assessment, and program development using a Person-Environment-Occupational Performance Model. Dr. Baum's research focuses on the role of cognition in everyday life and the enabling of everyday performance in people with chronic health conditions and disability. (Retrieved on Dec 19, 2014 from http://www.ot.wustl.edu/about/our-people/faculty/carolyn-m-baum-254.)

From 2001 to 2003, Dr. Baum was editor of the AOTF research journal, OTJR: Occupation, Participation and Health.  Dr. Baum is one of the 100 Influential People in Occupational Therapy named by AOTA.

 

Q and A

Identify three words that others have used to describe you.  
Doer, Enabler, Futurist.

How do you hope to make a difference in the world through research?
By building collaborations to address questions that improve the human condition.

What is one piece of advice you have for individuals considering a career in science and research?
Choose an environment where you work with successful scientists in your entry level training.

Beside your own areas of inquiry, what is one research priority that you believe is important for the future of occupational science and occupational therapy?
Understanding how social supports (emotional, informational and instrumental) support daily life.

Describe the most important role that mentors played in your professional journey.
Challenging my ideas.

Identify a favorite occupation that renews you outside of your work.
Cooking for guests.

What has been the most surprising or rewarding aspects of a career in science and research?
The relationships that develop from shared ideas to friendships.


Selected References

Baum, C. M. (1980). Eleanor Clarke Slagle Lectureship - 1980: Occupational therapists put care in the health system. The American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 34, 505-516.

Baum, CM & Edwards, D. (2008). Activity Sort Card: ACS. Bethesda, MD: AOTA Press.

Morrison, MT, Giles, GM, Ryan, JD, Baum, CM, Dromerick, AW, Polatajko, HJ & Edwards, DF. (2013). Multiple Errands Test - Revised (MET - R): A performance-based measure of executive function in people with mild cerebrovascular accident. The American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 67, 460-468.

Polatajko, HJ, McEwen, SE, Ryan, JD & Baum, CM. (2012). Pilot randomized controlled trial investigating cognitive strategy use to improve goal performance after stroke. The American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 66, 104-109.

Gary Bedell, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA

2016

Gary Bedell, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA

Dr. Bedell is associate professor and chair of the Department of Occupational Therapy at Tufts University. His research and scholarship involves development of measures and interventions focused on participation of children and youth with disabilities. He consults, writes and presents on conceptual and methodological considerations for measuring participation and the physical and social environment. His measures are used nationally and internationally.

He is author of the Child and Adolescent Scale of Participation (CASP) and Child and Adolescent Scale of Environment (CASE) and co-author of the Participation and Environment Measure for Children and Youth (PEM-CY) and Young Children's Participation and Environment Measure (YC-PEM). Dr. Bedell was Measurement Core Co-director for the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Interventions for Children and Youth with Traumatic Brain Injury and is Collaborating Researcher for the CanChild Centre for Childhood Disability Research, McMaster University. His currently funded research involves development and testing of an app-based coaching intervention for teenagers with traumatic brain injury: Social Participation And Navigation (SPAN).McCauley, S.R, Wilde, E.A., Anderson, V., Bedell, G., Beers, S., ... & Yeates, K.O. (2012).

 

Q and A

Identify three words that others have used to describe you.
Pragmatic, collaborative, and interdisciplinary.

How do you hope to make a difference in the world through research?
My plan is to continue to collaborate with multiple stakeholders locally and globally to ensure best practices to measure and promote participation of individuals with disabilities across the lifespan in home, school and community life. My hope is that my work and the work of many of my esteemed colleagues will ensure that stakeholders are able to select measures that can address their information goals and select intervention approaches that acknowledge and leverage the expertise of clients and their loved ones.

What is one piece of advice you have for individuals considering a career in science and research?
I would first say that there are many pathways to embark or re-embark on a career in science and research depending on your life situation, opportunities and level of commitment. These pathways could be in the form of post-doctoral fellowships, mentored research award, or developing your own self-directed collaborations with more experienced research mentors that are doing work in areas that resonate with you. Also, a committed work ethic, openness to feedback and development of a thick skin particularly in response to grant proposals that may not be funded or manuscripts that might be rejected or require extensive revisions will serve you well (I'm still working on the thicker skin).

Beside your own areas of inquiry, what is one research priority that you believe is important for the future of occupational science and occupational therapy?
An important future priority is research that examines effective, efficient and safe uses of technology and tele- health to deliver occupational therapy or occupational therapy-informed interdisciplinary interventions to help individuals with disabilities or at risk of disability and their loved ones to manage or co-manage daily life activities. I also believe continued study into the health and societal benefits of meaningful occupation are critical for the future of occupational therapy and science.

Describe the most important role that mentors played in your professional journey.
My mentors provided me with numerous opportunities that challenged me to step out of my comfort zone and provided me with constructive feedback along the way. This started in my doctoral program at NYU with Dr. Jim Hinojosa and continued during my post-doctoral fellowship at BU with Drs. Stephen Haley, Wendy Coster and Alan Jette. Key advice that has served me well was to collaborate and share resources with colleagues across disciplines and to seek out multiple funding sources especially when starting out whether this be through private foundations, professional associations, federal funding or internal funding.


Identify a favorite occupation that renews you outside of your work.
Kayaking with my dogs in Provincetown, Massachusetts where I also dabble a little bit in painting (so hard to choose one occupation :) .

What has been the most surprising or rewarding aspects of a career in science and research?
The most rewarding aspect of my work is the acknowledgement that many interdisciplinary colleagues around the world are using my measures and citing my prior studies to inform their research. This would not have been possible without the strong collaborations and sharing of knowledge and expertise I have had along the way.


Selected References

McCauley, S.R, Wilde, E.A., Anderson, V., Bedell, G., Beers, S., ... & Yeates, K.O. (2012). Recommendations for the use of common outcome measures on pediatric traumatic brain injury research. Journal of Neurotrauma, 29, 678-705. doi: 10.1089/neu.2011.1838. PMID 21644810.

Bedell, G., Coster, W., Law, M., Liljenquist, K., Kao, YC, Teplicky, R., Anaby, D, & Khetani, MA (2013). Community participation, supports and barriers of school-age children with and without disabilities. Archives of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, 94, 315-323. doi:10.1016/j.apmr.2012.09.024. PMID 23044364.

Bedell, G., Khetani, M. Cousins, M., Coster, W., & Law, M. (2011). Parent perspectives to inform development of measures of children's participation and environment. Archives of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, 9, 765- 773. doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2010.12.029. PMID 21530724.

Bedell, G., & McDougall, J. (2013). The Child and Adolescent Scale of Environment (CASE): Further validation with youth who have chronic health conditions. Developmental Neurorehabilitation. Early online publication. doi: 10.3109/17518423.2103.855273. PMID 24304145.

McDougall, J., Bedell, G., & Wright, V. (2013). The youth report version of the Child and Adolescent Scale of Participation (CASP): Assessment of psychometric properties and comparison with parent report. Child: Care, Health and Development, 39, 512-522. doi: 10.1111/cch.12050. PMID 23763252.

Keh-chung Lin, ScD, OTR/L

2017

Keh-chung Lin, ScD, OTR/L

Dr. Lin is professor of occupational therapy at National Taiwan University and currently serves as Director of the General Affairs division of the College of Medicine at the University. Dr. Lin and his collaborators study whether, and to what extent, new rehabilitation interventions, such as robotic therapy, restore purposeful movement and the ability to do daily activities in patients who have suffered a stroke. To understand how improvement happens, Dr. Lin studies the changes that occur in the brain while the person is engaged in those interventions or how the brain has changed as a result of those interventions. Then, to ensure that the patient and others can have confidence in the progress reported to them, Dr. Lin studies the reliability and responsiveness of tests that are used to measure improvement in voluntary movement and basic and extended activities of daily living in persons who have had a stroke.

 

 

SELECTED RESOURCES

 

Wu, C. Y., Chuang, I. C., Ma, H. I., Lin, K. C., & Chen, L (2016). Validity and responsiveness of the Revised Nottingham Sensation Assessment for outcome evaluation in stroke rehabilitation. The American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 70, (2), 1-8.  

Fan, Y.T., Wu, C.Y., Liu, H.L., Lin, K.C., Wai, Y.Y., & Chen, Y.L (2015).  Neuroplastic changes in resting-state functional connectivity after stroke rehabilitation.  Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 9, Article 546.  

Chen, H.L., Lin, K.C., Liing, R.J., Wu, C.Y., & Chen. C.L et al. (2015). Kinematic measures of Arm-trunk movements during unilateral and bilateral reaching predict clinically important change in perceived arm use in daily activities after intensive stroke rehabilitation. Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, 12, 84.  

Lin, K.C., Huang, P.C., Chen, Y.T., Wu, C.Y., & Huang, W.L (2014). Combining Afferent Stimulation and Mirror Therapy for Rehabilitating Motor Function, Motor Control, Ambulation, and Daily Functions after Stroke.   Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, 28(2), 153– 162.

Hsieh, Y.W., Wu, C.Y., Lin, K.C., Yao, G., Wu, & Chang, Y.J (2012). Dose–Response Relationship of Robot-Assisted Stroke Motor Rehabilitation the Impact of Initial Motor Status. Stroke, 43 (10), 2729-2734.

 

Daniel Bourbonnais, PhD, OT(C)

2007

Daniel Bourbonnais, PhD, OT(C)

Dr. Bourbonnais is Vice-dean for Research and Innovation in Science and Professor, University of Montreal and Researcher, Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Rehabilitation of Metropolitan Montreal.  His areas of research interest include the assessment and treatment of the upper limb; motor control of the hand; bilateral coordination; and posture and movement coordination in persons with stroke.  (Retrieved on December 21, 2014 from http://www.crir.ca/?A1E61E1F-3E97-456C-B6D9-6041A59AADDD&extendedview=1&extendedres=EC844717-CD62-448E-8B5B-C04A71426E31¶meters=ID:12.)  


Selected References

Forget, N, Piotte, F, Arsenault, J, Harris, P & Bourbonnais, D. (2008). Bilateral thumb's active range of motion and strength in de Quervain's disease: comparison with a normal sample. Journal of Hand Therapy, 21, (3), 276-284, Quiz, 285.

Knaut, L A, Subramanian, SK, McFadyen, BJ, Bourbonnais, D & Levin, MF. (2009). Kinematics of pointing movements made in a virtual versus a physical 3-dimensional environment in healthy and stroke subjects. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 90, 793-802.

Messier, S, Bourbonnais, D, Desrosiers, J & Roy, Y. (2006). Kinematic analysis of upper limbs and trunk movement during bilateral movement after stroke. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 87, (11), 1463-1470.

Catherine Lysack, PhD, OT(C)

2007

Catherine Lysack, PhD, OT(C)

Dr. Lysack is the Deputy Director of the Institute of Gerontology (IOG) and a Professor in the Department of Health Care Sciences (Occupational Therapy) at the Eugene Applebaum College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan.  

Dr. Lysack's research focuses on the social, physical and environmental influences on health, and understanding how older adults and people with disability redevelop active and meaningful lives in the community after illness and injury. She has conducted numerous studies including recent studies to evaluate methods to strengthen occupational therapy practice skills in mental health, and identify factors that facilitate community participation after spinal cord injury. She is presently conducted research on two projects: 1) Household Downsizing in Late Life, funded by the National Institute on Aging, and 2) Social Reintegration of Service-members and Veterans with Spinal Cord Injury Returning from Afghanistan and Iraq, funded by the U.S. Department of Defense. (Retrieved on June 9, 2015 from http://www.cphs.wayne.edu/research/occupational_research.php.)

 

Q AND A

Identify three words that others have used to describe you.
Curious. Tenacious. Diplomatic.

How do you hope to make a difference in the world through research?
I hope my work assists future therapists to be bold and creative in their work -- to examine functional problems in new ways so their patients can more easily achieve their goals.

What is one piece of advice you have for individuals considering a career in science and research?
Work on your writing skills now.  Scientists and researchers devote a great deal of time and effort to grant writing and publication of research findings.  Excellent writing skills are absolutely essential.

Beside your own areas of inquiry, what is one research priority that you believe is important for the future of occupational science and occupational therapy?
Science in general and science in the field of OS and OT should devote more resources to studying the root causes and effective treatments for mental health conditions, particularly depression.  Depression alone may be the single greatest cause of disability and lost productivity there is.  We should work harder on these large human problems.

Describe the most important role that mentors played in your professional journey.
Mentors make you believe you can do it, when you are less sure. Mentors open doors to understanding and insight and they inspire.  You will not go far, or anywhere worthwhile without mentors.

Identify a favorite occupation that renews you outside of your work.
Playing competitive squash and working outside planting green things!

What has been the most surprising or rewarding aspects of a career in science and research?
It is a pleasure seeing my work make a difference in practice.  Nothing is more satisfying than seeing a student or a clinician use my research findings to make life better for someone else.  That is the greatest reward.


REFERENCES

Arthanat, S, Vroman, KG & Lysack C.  (2014). A home-based individualized information communication technology training program for older adults: a demonstration of effectiveness and value. Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, 16, 1-9.  http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/17483107.2014.974219

Ficker, LJ, Lysack, CL, Hanna, M & Lichtenberg PA. (2014). Perceived Cognitive Impairment among African American elders: health and functional impairments in daily life.  Aging and Mental Health, 18, 471-480.

Luborsky, MR, Lysack, CL & Van Nuil, J. (2011). Refashioning One's Place in Time: Stories of Household Downsizing in Later Life.  Journal of Aging Studies, 25, 243-252.

Anita C. Bundy, ScD, OTR, FAOTA

2012

Anita C. Bundy, ScD, OTR, FAOTA

Dr. Bundy is Chair of Occupational Therapy in the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Sydney. For 3 decades, she has conducted research into children's play and is recognised as an expert internationally. She is best known for developing theory and research in play with children who have disabilities and in sensory integration. She has a strong interest in the everyday lives of children with disabilities   (Retrieved on Dec 19, 2014 from http://sydney.edu.au/health-sciences/about/people/profiles/anita.bundy.php.)     


Q and A

Identify three words that others have used to describe you.
Creative, persistent, playful.

How do you hope to make a difference in the world through research?
A lot of my research has been into children's play--often considered a "second class occupation". I hope that my work helps therapists and others to understand the importance of play and to promote it actively and unabashedly.

What is one piece of advice you have for individuals considering a career in science and research?
Do work that you are passionate about and develop a very thick skin.

Beside your own areas of inquiry, what is one research priority that you believe is important for the future of occupational science and occupational therapy?
I think that research testing interventions is among the most important work we have yet to do.

Describe the most important role that mentors played in your professional journey.
Mentors have asked the hard questions--the ones that make me ponder for weeks and sometimes years.

Identify a favorite occupation that renews you outside of your work.
There are several: cooking, gardening, playing the flute, hiking, biking.

What has been the most surprising or rewarding aspects of a career in science and research?
I always thought I would hate doing research and then I discovered that it was like a giant puzzle; you find one piece and it leads to the next.


Selected References

Bundy, AC, Kolrosova, J, Paguinto, SG, Bray, P, Swain, B, Wallen, M & Engelen, L. (2011). Comparing the effectiveness of a parent group intervention with child-based intervention for promoting playfulness in children with disabilities. The Israeli Journal of Occupational Therapy, 20, E95-E113.

Bundy, AC, Waugh, K & Brentnall, J. (2009). Developing assessments that account for the role of the environment: an example using the Test of Playfulness and Test of Environmental Supportiveness. OTJR: Occupation, Participation and Health, 29, 135-143.

Hill, C. & Bundy, AC. (2014).  Reliability and validity of a new instrument to measure tolerance of everyday risk for children. Child Care, Health and Development, 40, 68-76.

Annette Majnemer, BSc(OT), MSc, PhD

2012

Annette Majnemer, BSc(OT), MSc, PhD

Dr. Majnemer is Professor, Director and Associate Dean, School of Physical & Occupational Therapy and an Associate Member of the Departments of Pediatrics and Neurology & Neurosurgery at McGill University, Montréal, Québec, Canada.  Her research interests focus on the developmental, functional and quality of life outcomes of children with disabilities and their determinants. Populations of interest include preterm infants, children with congenital heart defects following open-heart surgery, children with cerebral palsy and developmental delay. She is also examining health service utilization patterns and quality of care in these populations.  (Retrieved on July 1, 20015 from https://www.mcgill.ca/spot/faculty/majnemer)    


Q AND A

Identify three words that others have used to describe you.
Creative; supportive; optimistic.

How do you hope to make a difference in the world through research?
Making a difference in the lives of children with disabilities and their families; by contributing new knowledge that is used to enhance their functioning, participation and well-being. I hope that I also inspire others to pursue academic research careers and be successful in making a difference in their own ways.

What is one piece of advice you have for individuals considering a career in science and research?
Follow your personal passions and interests; your work as an academic should excite you and stimulate you every day. Also, take advantage of the opportunity to work with colleagues within and across disciplines; this will greatly enrich your perspectives and potential for impact.

Beside your own areas of inquiry, what is one research priority that you believe is important for the future of occupational science and occupational therapy?
There are many gaps between our scientific discoveries and the use of this new knowledge by front-line occupational therapists and by consumers and decision-makers within the health care system. Occupational therapy researchers are well positioned to advance the field of knowledge translation and implementation science, so as to ensure that practices and policies are evidence-based and in line with best practices.

Describe the most important role that mentors played in your professional journey.  
Recognizing the importance and value of mentorship at all levels of your career trajectory; seeking out mentors to serve as role models that can guide you, and in turn, mentoring others that can benefit from your experiences and successes.

Identify a favorite occupation that renews you outside of your work.
I am fortunate to travel extensively, both as part of my academic work and also with my husband as part of leisure activities. These opportunities allow me to disconnect from the day to day occupations, enabling me to reflect on work and on life. These varied experiences continue to enrich my views and also energize and inspire me.

What has been the most surprising or rewarding aspects of a career in science and research?
The dedication and successes of my colleagues at the School of Physical & Occupational Therapy at McGill University is truly inspiring. I take tremendous pride in all that we have achieved together as a faculty, and I am honored to be their Director. My personal career achievements have been greatly facilitated by the incredible support of my husband and two daughters.


REFERENCES

Cavello, S, Majnemer, A, Duffy, CM & Ehrmann Feldman, D.  (2015). Participation in leisure activities by children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.  Journal of Rheumatology, 2015 Jun 15. pii: jrheum.140844. [Epub ahead of print]

Majnemer, A, Shikako-Thomas, K, Lach, L, Shevell, M, Law, M & Schmitz, N.The QUALAGroup.  (2013). Mastery motivation in adolescents with cerebral palsy. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 34, 384-392.

Solaski, M, Majnemer, A & Oskoui, M. (2014).  Contribution of socio-economic status on the prevalence of cerebral palsy: a systematic search and review. Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, 56, 1043-1051.

Leeanne M. Carey, BAppSC(OT), PhD

2009

Leeanne M. Carey, BAppSC(OT), PhD

Dr. Carey heads the Neurorehabilitation and Recovery research group in the Stroke Division, Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health and is Professor of Occupational Therapy, School of Allied Health, La Trobe University in Australia. Dr. Carey's research program focuses on stroke rehabilitation and recovery: in particular how the brain adapts and how we might harness that potential in rehabilitation. She uses tools such as MRI to investigate changes in the brain and how this knowledge may be used to better understand recovery and target rehabilitation most optimally to individual stroke survivors. Research includes the impact of depression and cognition on stroke recovery. An important focus has been to translate these discoveries into clinical practice and better outcomes for stroke survivors.  (Retrieved on February 5, 2015 from   http://www.florey.edu.au/about-florey/our-people/staff-directory/39/leeanne-carey.)   

 

Q and A

Identify three words that others have used to describe you.
Visionary, dedicated, collaborative.

How do you hope to make a difference in the world through research?
I hope to harness real world drivers of neural plasticity to help stroke survivors realise their full potential.
I also hope to grow research-clinicians and research capacity in occupational therapy.

What is one piece of advice you have for individuals considering a career in science and research?
Go for it! If you have a question and a passion then seek an active research environment with strong supervisory team and make it happen! The benefits for you, your clients and our profession are immeasurable.

Beside your own areas of inquiry, what is one research priority that you believe is important for the future of occupational science and occupational therapy?
I believe occupational therapists should be leading the way in conducting research that creates the right environment for healing and realising one's full potential.

Describe the most important role that mentors played in your professional journey.
Belief and challenge that help open the door to new perspectives and opportunities.

Identify a favorite occupation that renews you outside of your work.
Spending time with friends, family and colleagues who are also friends.

What has been the most surprising or rewarding aspects of a career in science and research?
Learning something new from each participant and student I work with, and seeing the difference new discoveries can make to the lives of people who have experienced brain injury.

 

Selected References

Carey, LM. (Ed.) (2012). Stroke rehabilitation insights from neuroscience and imaging.  New York: Oxford University Press.

Hubbard, IJ, Carey, LM, Budd, TW & Parsons, MW.   (2014). Reorganizing Therapy: Changing the Clinical Approach to Upper Limb Recovery Post-Stroke.  Occupational Therapy International, 18, 28-35.

Hubbard, IJ, Carey, LM, Budd, TW, Levi, C, McElduff, P, Hudson, S, Bateman, G & Parsons, MW.   (2014). A Randomized Controlled Trial of the Effect of Early Upper-Limb Training on Stroke Recovery and Brain Activation. Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, 19, 1545968314562647. [Epub ahead of print]

Pumpa, LU, Cahill, LS & Carey, LM.  (2015 Jan 23). Somatosensory assessment and treatment after stroke: An evidence-practice gap.  Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, doi: 10.1111/1440-1630.12170. [Epub ahead of print]

William Charles Mann, PhD, OTR, FAOTA

1994

William Charles Mann, PhD, OTR, FAOTA

Dr. Mann is Distinguished Professor and Chair of Occupational Therapy, Director of the PhD Program in Rehabilitation Science at the University of Florida (UF), Gainesville, Florida, and Director of the UF Center for Telehealth and Healthcare Communications.  Dr. Mann also serves as Director of the VA Center of Innovation on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (CINDRR) at the North Florida/South Georgia Veterans Health System, Gainesville, Florida. His research and rehabilitation experience extends internationally to collaborations in Canada, Europe and Brazil and Australia. Dr. Mann has over 35 years of experience in rehabilitation and community-based programs, spanning research, service and education, with a focus on applying technology to promote independence. Dr. Mann's current work addresses the needs of veterans with disabilities, applying home monitoring and communications technologies (telehealth, telerehabilitation) addressing the needs of Veterans with dementia and their caregivers, and tools for driver assessment and rehabilitation.  (Retrieved on July 1, 2015 from http://ot.phhp.ufl.edu/about/people/faculty/william-mann/) Dr. Mann was founder of the journal Technology and Disability and served as co-editor from 1990 to 2000.

 

REFERENCES

Belchior, P, Marsiske, M, Sisco, SM, Yam, A, Bavelier, D, Ball, K & Mann WC.  (2013). Video game training to improve selective visual attention in older adults. Computers in Human Behavior, 29, 1318-1324.

Davenport, RD, Mann, W & Lutz B. (2012). How older adults make decisions regarding smart technology: an ethnographic approach. Assistive Technology, 24, 168-181.

Gitlin, LN, Mann, WC, Vogel. WB & Arthur PB.  (2013 Sep 23). A non-pharmacologic approach to address challenging behaviors of Veterans with dementia: description of the tailored activity program-VA randomized trial. BMC Geriatrics, 2013 Sep 23;13:96. doi: 10.1186/1471-2318-13-96. 

Jane Case-Smith*, EdD, OTR/L, FAOTA

2015

Jane Case-Smith*, EdD, OTR/L, FAOTA

September 5, 1953 - July 30, 2014. Membership awarded posthumously.

At the time of her passing, Dr. Case-Smith was Professor and Director of the Program in Occupational Therapy in the School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Medicine at The Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio. A highly regarded educator, Dr. Case-Smith was co-editor and author of a widely adopted textbook: Occupational Therapy with Children, now in its seventh edition.

Jane Case-Smith was considered one of the nation's foremost experts in pediatric occupational therapy and rehabilitation. She studied, wrote, and lectured on a broad range of topics such as early intervention, autism spectrum disorders, cerebral palsy, movement therapy, and home-based services. She was also a respected clinical scientist, and had extensive experience as a grant reviewer for federal agencies and charitable foundations. At the time of her passing, she was principal investigator on two NIH-funded studies.  

In 2001, Dr. Case-Smith was the recipient of the AOTF A. Jean Ayres award.  From 2008 - 2011, she was the chief editor of OTJR: Occupation, Participation and Health, AOTF's research journal.  (Retrieved on February 25, 2015 from AOTF Mourns Passing of Dr. Jane Case-Smith.pdf)

An OTJR article (Roll, Darragh, O'Brien, and Fisher, 2014) celebrated Dr. Case-Smith's life and expounded on her outstanding contributions to occupational therapy as researcher, clinical practitioner, and educator.

Dr. Case-Smith is one of the 100 Influential People in Occupational Therapy named by AOTA.

 

Selected References

Case-Smith, J & O'Brien, JC. (Eds.).  (2015). Occupational therapy for children and Adolescents. (7th Ed.).  St Louis, Mo: Mosby/Elsevier.

Case-Smith, J, Frolek Clark, GJ & Schlabach, T. L. (2013). Systematic review of interventions used in occupational therapy to promote motor performance for children ages birth-5 years. The American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 67, 413-424.  

Case-Smith, J, Weaver, L & Holland T. (2014). Effects of a classroom-embeddedoccupational therapist-teacher handwriting program for first-grade students. The American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 68, 690-698.

DeLuca, SC, Case-Smith, J, Stevenson, R & Ramey SL.  (2012). Constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) for young children with cerebral palsy: effects of therapeutic dosage.  Journal of Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine, 5, 133-142.

Roll, SC, Darragh, AR, O'Brien, JC & Fisher, TF. (2014).  In Memoriam: Jane Douglas Case-Smith (September 5, 1953 - July 30, 2014). OTJR: Occupation, Participation and Health, 34, 171-175.

Virgil Mathiowetz, PhD, OTR, FAOTA

2002

Virgil Mathiowetz, PhD, OTR, FAOTA

Dr. Mathiowetz  is Associate Professor and Assistant Director Program in Occupational Therapy, Center for Allied Health Programs, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota. (Retrieved on July13, 2015 from http://cahp.umn.edu/websites/cahp/images/faculty-staff/cv-full2012.pdf)  His research interests include fatigue management in chronic conditions, multiple sclerosis, task-oriented approach to CNS dysfunction, stroke, functional outcomes, motor control  and motor learning, assessment of hand strength, dexterity, and hand function (Retrieved on July 13, 2015 from http://cahp.umn.edu/occupational-therapy-faculty)


Q AND A

Identify three words that others have used to describe you.
Persistent, Focused, Committed.

How do you hope to make a difference in the world through research?
I hope to improve the quality of care for the clients that we serve by improving the quality of OT assessments and interventions.

What is one piece of advice you have for individuals considering a career in science and research?
Find a strong mentor.

Beside your own areas of inquiry, what is one research priority that you believe is important for the future of occupational science and occupational therapy?
PCORI emphasis on comparative effectiveness studies.

Describe the most important role that mentors played in your professional journey.  
Mentors have both challenged and supported me in exploring research ideas and methodologies.

Identify a favorite occupation that renews you outside of your work.
I enjoy racquetball as an enjoyable aerobic exercise and an opportunity to be competitive with persons much younger than me!

What has been the most surprising or rewarding aspects of a career in science and research?
The most surprising aspect has been the fact that so many people have cited my early research on the measurement of grip and pinch strength. The most rewarding aspect has been the fact that my research has helped change OT assessments and interventions for the better! I believe that it has improved the quality of care that we provide to our clients. In addition, the opportunity to mentor future researchers and academicians has been very rewarding.


REFERENCES

Mathiowetz, V, Yu CH & Quake-Rapp, C.  (2015 Apr 22). Comparison of a gross anatomy laboratory to online anatomy software for teaching anatomy. Anatomical sciences education, doi: 10.1002/ase.1528. [Epub ahead of print].

Yu CH & Mathiowetz V.  (2014). Systematic review of occupational therapy-related interventions for people with multiple sclerosis: part 1. Activity and participation. The American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 68, 27-32.  

Yu, CH &  Mathiowetz, V.  (2014). Systematic review of occupational therapy-relatedinterventions for people with multiple sclerosis: part 2. Impairment. The American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 68, 33-38.

Sharon A. Cermak, EdD, OTR/L, FAOTA

1984

Sharon A. Cermak, EdD, OTR/L, FAOTA

Dr. Cermak is Professor, Mrs. T.H. Chan Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles and has a joint appointment with the Keck School of Medicine of USC, Department of Pediatrics.  Dr. Cermak is renowned for her expertise in Dyspraxia/Developmental Coordination Disorder, a long-standing interest of hers. . . [Her] current research focuses on health promotion in children with disabilities, which is a critical area of national health concern for children.  (Retrieved on January 29, 2015 from http://chan.usc.edu/faculty/directory/Sharon_Cermak.)

In 1991, Dr. Cermak received the AOTF A. Jean Ayres Award.  Dr. Cermak is one of the 100 Influential People in Occupational Therapy named by AOTA.


Selected References

Foran, AC, Cermak, SA & Spruijt-Metz, D.  (2013). Psychosocial determinants of participation in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity among Hispanic and Latinamiddle school-aged girls. Hispanic Health Care International, 11, 142-148.

Lifshitz, N, Raz-Silbiger, S, Weintraub, N, Steinhart, S, Cermak, SA & Katz N.  (2014).

Physical fitness and overweight in Israeli children with and without developmental coordination disorder: gender differences.  Research in Developmental Disabilities, 35, 2773-2780.

Raz-Silbiger, S, Lifshitz, N, Katz, N, Steinhart, S, Cermak, SA & Weintraub N.  (2015). Relationship between motor skills, participation in leisure activities and quality of life of children with Developmental Coordination Disorder: Temporal aspects. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 38, 171-180. 

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